ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
composite image of favorite posts
Our Favorite Genetics Stories of 2022
This year’s stories highlight the expanding versatility of genetic techniques and the increasing utility of such research in all life science fields.
Our Favorite Genetics Stories of 2022
Our Favorite Genetics Stories of 2022

This year’s stories highlight the expanding versatility of genetic techniques and the increasing utility of such research in all life science fields.

This year’s stories highlight the expanding versatility of genetic techniques and the increasing utility of such research in all life science fields.

lateral gene transfer

A C-fern (Ceratopteris richardii) growing in a pot
Genome Spotlight: C-fern (Ceratopteris richardii)
Christie Wilcox, PhD | Sep 22, 2022 | 5 min read
Sequences for the model organism and two of its kin reveal how these plants got their oversized genomes.
a microscope image of a rotifer
Bacterial Enzyme Keeps Rotifers’ Transposable Elements in Check
Christie Wilcox, PhD | Mar 3, 2022 | 5 min read
Jumping genes in bdelloid rotifers are tamped down by DNA methylation performed by an enzyme pilfered from bacteria roughly 60 million years ago, a study finds.
This Parasitic Plant Steals More Than Nutrients From Its Hosts
David Smith | Feb 1, 2017 | 3 min read
The plant Lophophytum pilfers mitochondrial genes from the species it parasitizes.
Phages Carry Antibiotic Resistance Genes
Abby Olena, PhD | Dec 7, 2016 | 2 min read
Researchers find evidence of antibiotic resistance genes in the DNA of viruses that infect bacteria.
Black Widow Secrets in Phage Genome
Jef Akst | Oct 12, 2016 | 2 min read
In the DNA of the WO phage, which infects arthropod-inhabiting Wolbachia, researchers find sequences related to a black widow spider’s toxin and other animal genes.
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Oct 1, 2016 | 3 min read
Meet some of the people featured in the October 2016 issue of The Scientist
Bacteria and Humans Have Been Swapping DNA for Millennia
Kelly Robinson and Julie Dunning Hotopp | Oct 1, 2016 | 8 min read
Bacteria inhabit most tissues in the human body, and genes from some of these microbes have made their way to the human genome. Could this genetic transfer contribute to diseases such as cancer?
Lateral Gene Transfer in Drosophila
Kelly Robinson and Julie Dunning Hotopp | Sep 30, 2016 | 1 min read
DNA transfer is a regular event among bacteria, and research over the past decade has shown that microbes can also shuttle their genetic material to multicellular hosts.
Bacteria Can Integrate Degraded DNA
Kerry Grens | Nov 18, 2013 | 4 min read
In lab experiments, bacteria usurp small, damaged fragments of DNA, including those from a 43,000-year-old woolly mammoth.  
Contributors
Chris Palmer and Kate Yandell | Sep 1, 2013 | 3 min read
Meet some of the people featured in the September 2013 issue of The Scientist.
Going Viral
Breeann Kirby and Jeremy J. Barr | Sep 1, 2013 | 10+ min read
From therapeutics to gene transfer, bacteriophages offer a sustainable and powerful method of controlling microbes.
Going Viral
Breeann Kirby and Jeremy J. Barr | Aug 31, 2013 | 1 min read
Bacteriophages shuttle genes between diverse ecosystems.
Coffee Pest Gene Transfer
Hannah Waters | Feb 27, 2012 | 3 min read
An insect that plagues coffee plants likely got its bean-digesting gene from a bacterium.
ADVERTISEMENT