False color image of two Caenorhabditis elegans roundworms; blue on a black background
Mitochondrial Stress Is Passed Between Generations
Researchers identified a novel mechanism by which chemically induced stress is “remembered” by the mitochondria of worms more than 50 generations after the original trigger.
ABOVE: iStock.com HeitiPaves
Mitochondrial Stress Is Passed Between Generations
Mitochondrial Stress Is Passed Between Generations

Researchers identified a novel mechanism by which chemically induced stress is “remembered” by the mitochondria of worms more than 50 generations after the original trigger.

Researchers identified a novel mechanism by which chemically induced stress is “remembered” by the mitochondria of worms more than 50 generations after the original trigger.

ABOVE: iStock.com HeitiPaves

mitochondrial stress response

How C. elegans Transmit Stress Signals to Offspring
Infographic: How C. elegans Transmit Stress Signals to Offspring
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Neurons stressed with chemicals produce Wnt, which in turn triggers changes in the germline.
Mouse heart cells that have taken up adipocyte-derived extracellular vesicles (stained red)
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From plants to mice and human cells, tetracyclines lead to mitochondrial dysfunction in model organisms.
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From DNA damage to cellular miscommunication, aging is a mysterious and multifarious process.
Inhibit Mitochondria to Live Longer?
Sabrina Richards | May 22, 2013
Researchers find that reducing mitochondrial protein production in some animals can increase lifespan by activating a protective stress response.