Slime mold colony with volcano-like spores
Cancer-like Slime Mold Growth Hints at Multicellularity’s Origins
The poorly understood Fonticula alba, a relative of fungi and animals, hunts bacteria with a mechanism that resembles cancer and fungal growth.
Cancer-like Slime Mold Growth Hints at Multicellularity’s Origins
Cancer-like Slime Mold Growth Hints at Multicellularity’s Origins

The poorly understood Fonticula alba, a relative of fungi and animals, hunts bacteria with a mechanism that resembles cancer and fungal growth.

The poorly understood Fonticula alba, a relative of fungi and animals, hunts bacteria with a mechanism that resembles cancer and fungal growth.

Model systems
a leopard gecko with an unusually yellow body
“Lemon Frost” Leopard Geckos’ Cancers Similar to Human Melanomas
Christie Wilcox | Jun 24, 2021
The color morph’s bright yellow hue and its propensity for skin tumors both likely stem from a gene implicated in a dangerous form of human skin cancer, suggesting the animals could make an ideal model for studying the disease.
The Many Model Systems of COVID-19
Abby Olena | Nov 4, 2020
Researchers turn to familiar model animals, along with some fresh strategies, to develop countermeasures against SARS-CoV-2 and investigate the biology of infection.
Image of the Day: Remodeled
Sukanya Charuchandra | Jun 25, 2018

Researchers use CRISPR-Cas9 to create transgenic Hydractinia symbiolongicarpus, a cnidarian, for the first time.

More Mini Brains
Jef Akst | Feb 17, 2016
Simple versions of brain organoids could serve as new models for testing the effects of drugs, researchers reported at this year’s AAAS meeting. 
Lab-Grown Model Brains
Ed Yong | Aug 28, 2013
Three-dimensional tissues called “cerebral organoids” can model the earliest stages of brain development.
Contributors
Beth Marie Mole | Mar 1, 2013
Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.