“Lemon Frost” Leopard Geckos’ Cancers Similar to Human Melanomas
“Lemon Frost” Leopard Geckos’ Cancers Similar to Human Melanomas
The color morph’s bright yellow hue and its propensity for skin tumors both likely stem from a gene implicated in a dangerous form of human skin cancer, suggesting the animals could make an ideal model for studying the disease.
“Lemon Frost” Leopard Geckos’ Cancers Similar to Human Melanomas
“Lemon Frost” Leopard Geckos’ Cancers Similar to Human Melanomas

The color morph’s bright yellow hue and its propensity for skin tumors both likely stem from a gene implicated in a dangerous form of human skin cancer, suggesting the animals could make an ideal model for studying the disease.

The color morph’s bright yellow hue and its propensity for skin tumors both likely stem from a gene implicated in a dangerous form of human skin cancer, suggesting the animals could make an ideal model for studying the disease.

Model systems
The Many Model Systems of COVID-19
The Many Model Systems of COVID-19
Abby Olena | Nov 4, 2020
Researchers turn to familiar model animals, along with some fresh strategies, to develop countermeasures against SARS-CoV-2 and investigate the biology of infection.
Image of the Day: Remodeled
Image of the Day: Remodeled
Sukanya Charuchandra | Jun 25, 2018

Researchers use CRISPR-Cas9 to create transgenic Hydractinia symbiolongicarpus, a cnidarian, for the first time.

More Mini Brains
More Mini Brains
Jef Akst | Feb 17, 2016
Simple versions of brain organoids could serve as new models for testing the effects of drugs, researchers reported at this year’s AAAS meeting. 
Lab-Grown Model Brains
Lab-Grown Model Brains
Ed Yong | Aug 28, 2013
Three-dimensional tissues called “cerebral organoids” can model the earliest stages of brain development.
Contributors
Contributors
Beth Marie Mole | Mar 1, 2013
Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.