artistic representation of a jumping gene
Jumping Genes Can Cause Movement Disorder: Study
Mice with overactive LINE-1 retrotransposons in their brains exhibit movement difficulties, suggesting the genetic elements may play a role in ataxia in humans. 
Jumping Genes Can Cause Movement Disorder: Study
Jumping Genes Can Cause Movement Disorder: Study

Mice with overactive LINE-1 retrotransposons in their brains exhibit movement difficulties, suggesting the genetic elements may play a role in ataxia in humans. 

Mice with overactive LINE-1 retrotransposons in their brains exhibit movement difficulties, suggesting the genetic elements may play a role in ataxia in humans. 

mouse research
Genetic knockout experiments reveal a role for the protein in forming and maintaining synapses between motor neurons and muscle fibers in mice.
Infographic: Vangl2 in Muscles Keeps Neuromuscular Junctions Organized
Catherine Offord | Sep 12, 2022
Genetic knockout experiments reveal a role for the protein in forming and maintaining synapses between motor neurons and muscle fibers in mice.
Neurons and muscle tissue
A Novel Player at the Neuromuscular Junction
Catherine Offord | Sep 12, 2022
The muscle transmembrane protein Vangl2 helps organize the development and maintenance of connections between muscles and motor neurons, a study concludes.
Karyotype with most chromosomes in blue, one in red and green. 
Researchers Fuse Mouse Chromosomes in Scientific First
Natalia Mesa | Aug 25, 2022
The findings will likely help elucidate the effects of chromosome fusions, which can cause disease but have also contributed to evolution.
Fluorescent microscopy of a healthy intestinal organoid and a tumor spheroid
Internal Clock Disruptions Increase Colon Cancer Risk in Mice
Shafaq Zia | Aug 19, 2022
Disturbing circadian rhythms in organoids and mice increases intestinal tumor growth, findings that may explain a recent rise in colon cancer among young adults, the researchers behind the work say.
microscope image series showing synthetic embryo development
Mouse Embryo: No Sperm, Egg, or Uterus Required
Christie Wilcox | Aug 2, 2022
Using stem cells and a bioreactor, researchers generated living embryos that survived for more than a week and began to develop internal organs.
mouse nose peeking out from between two yellow objects
Not-so-Mellow Yellow: Pregnant Mice’s Urine Stresses Out Males
Sophie Fessl | Jun 20, 2022
An odorant found in the pee of pregnant mice—and in bananas—induces stress but also relieves pain in male mice, a study shows.
Photo of John Calhoun crouches within his rodent utopia-turned-dystopia
Universe 25, 1968–1973
Annie Melchor | May 2, 2022
A series of rodent experiments showed that even with abundant food and water, personal space is essential to prevent societal collapse.
Conceptual image of blue neurons with glowing segments over blue background.
CRACK Method Reveals Novel Neuron Type in Mouse Brain
Dan Robitzski | Apr 18, 2022
A new technique reveals cells’ precise locations and functions in the brain. Its developers have already used it to identify a previously unknown neuron type.
Illustration showing how calcium imaging and HCR-FISH combined is a technique called comprehensive readout of activity and cell type markers (CRACK)
Infographic: Simultaneously Studying Neuron Structure and Function
Dan Robitzski | Apr 18, 2022
A new methodology combines existing techniques to reveal the specific function and location of multiple types of neurons at once.
white mouse with pups
Doubts Raised Over Whether Mice Can Truly Inherit Immunity
David Adam | Jan 26, 2022
An independent lab fails to replicate results suggesting mammals exposed to pathogens could pass on immunological protections through epigenetic mechanisms.
white adult mouse with 4 pups on white background
Mice that Survive Infection Pass on Stronger Immunity
David Adam | Oct 18, 2021
Offspring of animals subjected to a real or simulated pathogen were more able to fend off disease, a study finds.
Photograph of a mouse covering his face with his paw.
Bless You: Mouse Model Reveals Molecular Pathway Behind Sneezing
Amanda Heidt | Oct 1, 2021
Researchers have identified specific cells and neuropeptides involved in mediating the sneeze response in mice exposed to allergens or chemical irritants such as capsaicin.
Illustration showing how a mouse study identifies the brain regions and specific signaling factors that regulate the sneeze response.
Infographic: The Neural Pathway of Sneezing
Amanda Heidt | Oct 1, 2021
A mouse study identifies the brain regions and specific signaling factors that regulate the sneeze response.
Immunofluorescence image of human tenocytes (cell nuclei in blue, actin in red) with PIEZO1 protein labeled in green (Scale bar: 20 ?m)
Mechanosensory Protein Helps Tendons Stiffen After Exercise
Catherine Offord | Sep 1, 2021
Researchers identify a role for PIEZO1 in tendon adaptation, and show that people with certain versions of the Piezo1 gene tend to be better jumpers.
One hand holds a white envelope with a blue and red striped border, while a second hand places a clear sheet of plastic inside with small squares of paper on it
Freeze-Dried Mouse Sperm Sent by Postcard Produces Baby Mice
Amanda Heidt | Aug 5, 2021
Rather than relying on samples that need to be shipped in glass vials and on ice, researchers have developed a new method that allows mouse sperm to be sent easily at room temperature using standard mail delivery.
A black mouse runs on a yellow and green spinning wheel against a blue background
Exercising During Pregnancy Protects Mouse Offspring
Jack J. Lee | Aug 1, 2021
Obese mice that exercised while pregnant gave birth to pups that grew up free of the metabolic issues present in the adult young of sedentary obese mothers—possibly by staving off epigenetic changes to a key metabolic gene.
Two oligodendrocyte progenitor cells are being generated from adult stem cells nestled on the surface of brain ventricle
Scientists Discover “Gorditas” and Other Novel Brain Cell Types
Amanda Heidt | Jun 10, 2021
A pool of neural stem cells that ordinarily lies dormant in the brains of adult mice spawns two types of never-before-documented glial cells when artificially reactivated, potentially pointing to a novel mechanism of brain plasticity.
The Brain’s Immune Cells Stand Sentinel Against Viral Invasion
Ashley Yeager | Oct 1, 2020
Some viruses, possibly even SARS-CoV-2, can sneak into the brain through the nose. Recent studies show that microglia are ready for them when they do.
Malaria Parasites’ Biological Clocks Coordinate Cell Destruction
Abby Olena | May 14, 2020
Two studies show that Plasmodium—the genus of protozoans that cause malaria—have an internal sense of time that synchronizes with their host’s circadian rhythms and allows the parasites to collectively attack blood cells.