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“Dragon Man” May Replace Neanderthal as Our Closest Relative
“Dragon Man” May Replace Neanderthal as Our Closest Relative
A massive, well-preserved skull discovered in China in the 1930s belongs to a new species called Homo longi, researchers report, but experts remain skeptical about the evidence.
“Dragon Man” May Replace Neanderthal as Our Closest Relative
“Dragon Man” May Replace Neanderthal as Our Closest Relative

A massive, well-preserved skull discovered in China in the 1930s belongs to a new species called Homo longi, researchers report, but experts remain skeptical about the evidence.

A massive, well-preserved skull discovered in China in the 1930s belongs to a new species called Homo longi, researchers report, but experts remain skeptical about the evidence.

paleobiology
Unearthed: World’s Oldest Animal Sperm—And It’s Giant
Unearthed: World’s Oldest Animal Sperm—And It’s Giant
Max Kozlov | Dec 1, 2020
The sperm, belonging to a tiny marine crustacean, dates back nearly 100 million years, making it the most ancient animal sperm found to date.
Ape Fossils Shed New Light on Evolution of Bipedalism
Ape Fossils Shed New Light on Evolution of Bipedalism
Catherine Offord | Nov 7, 2019
The 12-million-year-old bones of a previously unknown species named Danuvius guggenmosi challenge the prevailing view about when and where our ancestors first started walking upright.
Image of the Day: Fossilized Eyes
Image of the Day: Fossilized Eyes
Nicoletta Lanese | Aug 20, 2019
Both modern and ancient crane fly eyes contain eumelanin, a light-screening pigment.
Fossilized Tubes Point to Super-Ancient Mobile Organisms
Fossilized Tubes Point to Super-Ancient Mobile Organisms
Jef Akst | Feb 12, 2019
If the structures identified in a 2.1-billion-year-old rock are really signs of burrowing organisms, it would push back the earliest known mobile organisms by 1.5 billion years.
Paleoart
Paleoart
The Scientist Staff | Dec 31, 2018
See an update from Chicago's Field Museum about the works of Charles R. Knight and other paleoartists who pioneered the depiction of ancient life.
First Vertebrates Evolved in Shallow Water
First Vertebrates Evolved in Shallow Water
Kerry Grens | Oct 25, 2018
Fish stuck to coastal habitats for nearly 100 million years after they first appeared.
Fossilized Lipids Confirm <em>Dickinsonia</em> as One of the Earliest Animals
Fossilized Lipids Confirm Dickinsonia as One of the Earliest Animals
Ruth Williams | Sep 20, 2018
An analysis of organic material from 500-million-year-old fossils upholds the theory that the mysterious creatures were early forms of animal life.
Fossilized Beetle Is Earliest Evidence of Insect Pollinator
Fossilized Beetle Is Earliest Evidence of Insect Pollinator
Abby Olena | Aug 16, 2018
A 99-million-year-old beetle preserved in amber alongside grains of pollen likely pollinated prehistoric plants.
Why Are Modern Humans Relatively Browless?
Why Are Modern Humans Relatively Browless?
Jim Daley | Jul 1, 2018
The function of early hominins’ enlarged brow ridges, and their reduction in size in Homo sapiens, have puzzled paleoanthropologists for decades.
Fossilized Brains Called into Question, Might be Microbes
Fossilized Brains Called into Question, Might be Microbes
Abby Olena | Apr 11, 2018
Authors of a new study suggest that 520-million-year-old structures, previously identified as the brains of ancient arthropods, are instead preserved microbial biofilms.
Paleoproteomics Opens a Window into the Past
Paleoproteomics Opens a Window into the Past
Catherine Offord | Mar 1, 2018
Researchers are looking to proteins to explore the biology of ancient organisms, from medieval humans all the way back to dinosaurs.
Infographic: From Sediments to Sequences
Infographic: From Sediments to Sequences
Catherine Offord | Feb 28, 2018
How to analyze ancient proteins
Another New Timeline for <em>Homo naledi</em>
Another New Timeline for Homo naledi
Tracy Vence | Apr 27, 2017
The ancient human may have lived around 200,000 to 300,000 years ago—much more recently than previously estimated.
Image of the Day: Primordial Plants
Image of the Day: Primordial Plants
The Scientist Staff | Mar 8, 2017
This ancient relative of the Ginkgo biloba (Umaltolepis mongoliensis) dates back 100 million years, to the early Cretaceous Period.
Extinct River Dolphin Species Discovered
Extinct River Dolphin Species Discovered
Alison F. Takemura | Aug 16, 2016
Overlooked for half a century, a skull in the Smithsonian collection points to a dolphin species that lived 25 million years ago, according to a study.
The Neanderthal in the Mirror
The Neanderthal in the Mirror
Lydia Pyne | Aug 1, 2016
Our evolutionary cousin is no longer a blundering caveman. Recent research has painted a picture of a human ancestor with culture, art, and advanced cognitive skills.
Book Excerpt from <em>Seven Skeletons</em>
Book Excerpt from Seven Skeletons
Lydia Pyne | Jul 31, 2016
In Chapter 1, “The Old Man of La Chapelle: The Patriarch of Paleo,” author Lydia Pyne explains the public's evolving conception of the first complete Neanderthal skeleton found and described by scientists.
To Retain a Brain
To Retain a Brain
Karen Zusi | Jan 1, 2016
Exceptional neural fossil preservation helps answer questions about ancient arthropod evolution.