Photo of fish in the Haemulidae family
Fish Are Chattier Than Previously Thought
Once thought to be silent, fish turn out to produce a range of vocalizations—so polluting the oceans with noise could pose a danger to them.
ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, Laurent Olivier
Fish Are Chattier Than Previously Thought
Fish Are Chattier Than Previously Thought

Once thought to be silent, fish turn out to produce a range of vocalizations—so polluting the oceans with noise could pose a danger to them.

Once thought to be silent, fish turn out to produce a range of vocalizations—so polluting the oceans with noise could pose a danger to them.

ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, Laurent Olivier

phylogenetics

Close up photo of a wing
Unearthing the Evolutionary Origins of Insect Wings
Jef Akst | Apr 4, 2022
A handful of new studies moves the needle toward a consensus on the long-disputed question of whether insect wings evolved from legs or from the body wall, but the devil is in the details.
Photo of a Jewel beetle <em>(Sternocera aequisignata)</em>.
Why Are Some Beetles Shiny? It’s Not What Researchers Thought
Connor Lynch | Mar 1, 2022
The glossy shell of some beetles, it has long been speculated, helps hide the insects from predators. A recent paper put the hypothesis to the test—and found it wanting.
stone panel depicting a horselike animal led by ropes around the neck
Ancient Mesopotamians Bred Horselike Hybrids
Chris Baraniuk | Jan 14, 2022
A genomics study reveals the parentage of a long-mysterious creature called a kunga, the earliest-known hybrid animal bred by humans.
5 images related to stories highlighted in the article, including DNA strand, insect, and dog
Our Favorite Genetics Stories of 2021
Christie Wilcox | Dec 23, 2021
Studies The Scientist covered this year illustrate the expanding importance of genetic and genomic research in all aspects of life science, from ecology to medicine.
The man-of-war fish (Nomeus gronovii), a species of medusafish, near the tentacles of a siphonophore.
Medusafishes Are Grouped by Shared, Odd Traits: Study
Devin A. Reese | Dec 1, 2021
Shared features, such as thick, slimy skin and a throat filled with teeth, suggest that medusafishes are all related.
a colorful ctenophore/comb jelly swimming
Genome Spotlight: California Sea Gooseberry (Hormiphora californensis)
Christie Wilcox | Nov 24, 2021
The first chromosome-level genome assembly for a ctenophore may allow scientists to finally resolve the roots of the animal family tree.
A scanning electron micrograph of the picozoan Picomonas judraskeda
Picozoans Are Algae After All: Study
Christie Wilcox | May 6, 2021
Phylogenomics data place the enigmatic plankton in the middle of the algal family tree, despite their apparent lack of plastids—an organelle characteristic of all other algae.
An illustration of an orange bacteriophage virus sitting on top of a green bacterium
Some Viruses Use an Alternative Genetic Alphabet
Abby Olena | Apr 29, 2021
In a trio of studies, researchers follow up on a 40-year-old finding that certain bacteriophages replace adenine with so-called diaminopurine, perhaps to avoid host degradation.
seattle coronavirus outbreak pandemic covid-19 sars-cov-2 genome wa1 washington transmission wuhan china
First US Outbreak of COVID-19 Seeded in Mid-February: Preprint
Kerry Grens | May 27, 2020
A modeling study counters initial interpretations that the cluster began with someone who flew to Seattle in mid-January.
Image of the Day: Vestibular System
Amy Schleunes | Mar 13, 2020
The inner ear cavity proves to be a useful tool for studying the evolutionary relationships among monkeys, apes, and humans.
Genomes Sequenced for Every US and Canada Butterfly
Emily Makowski | Nov 20, 2019
Researchers analyzed more than 800 species.
Image of the Day: Beetle Evolution
Emily Makowski | Nov 19, 2019
Plants, fungi, and bacteria likely contributed to insect diversity.
Image of the Day: Stick and Leaf Insects
Emily Makowski | Oct 15, 2019
The first phylogenomic tree of these insects shows their diversification occurred after they split into Old and New World groups.
A Lost Microbial World the scientist
Prehistoric Microbes Inhabit an Oasis in the Northern Mexican Desert
Diana Kwon | Mar 1, 2019
The blue lagoons of the Cuatro Ciénegas Basin provide a glimpse into the planet’s ancient past.
notebook
Clues to How Ancient Plants Handled Fungal Pests
Jef Akst | Feb 1, 2019
In plants ranging from liverworts to wheat, parasitic water molds build intracellular structures analogous to the nutrient-exchanging structures of symbiotic fungi.
Image of the Day: Single-Cell Surprises
Jef Akst | Nov 15, 2018
Researchers identify a new species of Hemimastigophora protist, and suggest the group should be promoted from a phylum to a supra-kingdom.

Infographic: Resurrecting Ancient Proteins
Amber Dance | Jul 1, 2018

Learn the basic steps researchers take when reconstructing proteins from the past and how these biomolecules can inform engineering projects.

Scientists Bring Ancient Proteins Back to Life
Amber Dance | Jul 1, 2018
Researchers are resurrecting proteins from millions of years ago to understand evolution and lay the groundwork for bioengineering custom molecules.
Opinion: Archaea Is Our Evolutionary Sister, Not Mother
Morgan Gaia, Violette Da Cunha, Patrick Forterre | Jun 1, 2018
The ancient organisms appear to be more closely related to eukaryotes than previously appreciated.