Miscellaneous diatoms, appearing as translucent blue and brownish circles and rhomboid shapes, are imaged in front of a black background.
Q&A: Fluorescence Lets Diatoms Communicate, Coordinate Behavior
The Scientist spoke with physicist and microbial ecologist Idan Tuval, whose recent paper challenges the assumption that these single-celled organisms only communicate via chemical signals.
ABOVE: NOAA, GORDON T. TAYLOR
Q&A: Fluorescence Lets Diatoms Communicate, Coordinate Behavior
Q&A: Fluorescence Lets Diatoms Communicate, Coordinate Behavior

The Scientist spoke with physicist and microbial ecologist Idan Tuval, whose recent paper challenges the assumption that these single-celled organisms only communicate via chemical signals.

The Scientist spoke with physicist and microbial ecologist Idan Tuval, whose recent paper challenges the assumption that these single-celled organisms only communicate via chemical signals.

ABOVE: NOAA, GORDON T. TAYLOR

phytoplankton

man in motorboat by a pier with the sea surface covered in marine mucilage
Why Turkey’s Sea of Marmara Is Full of Marine Snot
Christie Wilcox | Jun 11, 2021
Turkish officials are scrambling to clean up a massive, gooey plankton bloom that’s sliming the country’s ports and could suffocate the area’s marine ecosystems.
A microscope image of a dinoflagellate.
Dinoflagellate Genome Structure Unlike Any Other Known
Amanda Heidt | May 10, 2021
The transcription of DNA drives the remarkably tidy organization of chromosomes in the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium microadriaticum.
green algae, phytoplankton, giant virus, genetics & genomics, endogenization, evolution, diversity, eukaryote
Giant Viruses Can Integrate into the Genomes of Their Hosts
Amanda Heidt | Nov 19, 2020
Rather than introducing small chunks of DNA as other viruses do, some giant viruses can contribute more than 1 million base pairs to a host’s genome, broadening the ways in which viruses may shape eukaryote evolution.
A Last-Minute Science Dash to an Erupting Volcano
Jef Akst | Dec 1, 2019
Researchers plan an oceanographic expedition to understand why a phytoplankton bloom developed as molten lava flowed into the sea east of Hawaii's Big Island.
Red Tides Under the Microscope
Bob Grant | Nov 1, 2019
Understanding the dinoflagellates that regularly wreak havoc on marine and nearshore ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico could help researchers mitigate the damage they cause.
Infographic: Red Tides Still Hold Tantalizing Mysteries
Bob Grant | Nov 1, 2019
A full description of the lifecycle of Karenia brevis could lead to improved monitoring, prediction, and mitigation of the harmful algal blooms it regularly causes.
Image of the Day: Algal Blooms
Emily Makowski | Oct 23, 2019
The majority of lakes studied experienced increased bloom intensity over the past few decades.
Nine Decades of Environmental Change Resurrected From Swedish Seas
Claire Asher | Jul 16, 2017
Scientists bring marine plankton back to life to study past climate change.
Ocean Microbes Alter Skies?
Amanda B. Keener | Jul 21, 2015
Satellite data suggest aerosols from bacteria and phytoplankton seed dense, highly reflective clouds.
Study: Arctic Warming Will Snowball
Jef Akst | Apr 28, 2015
Phytoplankton in the Arctic Ocean could amplify warming near the North Pole.
Complexities of Carbon Lowering
Joe Turner | Dec 2, 2014
Iron fertilization might be less efficient at storing carbon in the deep ocean than previously reported.
Microbe’s Diversity Is Vast, Ancient
Kerry Grens | Apr 24, 2014
A marine cyanobacterium possesses astounding genomic diversity, yet still organizes into distinct subpopulations that have likely persisted for ages.
Genome Digest
Chris Palmer | Jun 24, 2013
What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes
Science on Ice
Cristina Luiggi | Jan 2, 2013
Meet the research team that uncovered an algal bloom churning in freezing Arctic waters.
Arctic Bloomers
Cristina Luiggi | Jan 1, 2013
Scientists studying the Arctic Ocean aboard a US Coast Guard icebreaker discover one of the largest phytoplankton blooms ever recorded—beneath sea ice.