Illustration of blue shiny mitochondria
Worms Live Longer with Mitochondria Powered by Light: Preprint
Increasing mitochondrial activity in worms by engineering a light-activated proton pump into the organelle’s membrane extends the animals’ lifespan without evidence of health decline, according to a preprint.
Worms Live Longer with Mitochondria Powered by Light: Preprint
Worms Live Longer with Mitochondria Powered by Light: Preprint

Increasing mitochondrial activity in worms by engineering a light-activated proton pump into the organelle’s membrane extends the animals’ lifespan without evidence of health decline, according to a preprint.

Increasing mitochondrial activity in worms by engineering a light-activated proton pump into the organelle’s membrane extends the animals’ lifespan without evidence of health decline, according to a preprint.

preprint
Woman waiting in line at the airport, carrying a bag and standing next to two other suitcases. She is wearing a N95 face mask.
SARS-CoV-2 in the Air: What’s Known and What Isn’t
Alejandra Manjarrez | Feb 18, 2022
Evidence suggests that COVID-19 is primarily an airborne disease. Yet the details of how transmission occurs are still debated and frequently misunderstood.
Artist’s rendering of brain fog: a bright blue drawing of a brain sits inside of a pink drawing of a head in profile surrounded by miscellaneous shapes
Brain Fog Caused by Long COVID and Chemo Appear Similar
Dan Robitzski | Jan 28, 2022
Data from mouse models for mild coronavirus infections and human tissue samples offer further evidence that it doesn’t take a severe infection—or even infection of brain cells at all—to cause long-term neurological symptoms.
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Opinion: In Defense of Preprints
Richard Sever and John Inglis | Nov 11, 2021
In response to two November 2021 articles in The Scientist that called out preprints as a source of medical misinformation, the cofounders of bioRxiv and medRxiv say it’s not the publishing model that’s at fault.
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Brave New Publishing World
Bob Grant | Nov 1, 2021
Preprints are likely here to stay. The press, the public, and the research community must adapt to this relatively recent model of scientific publishing if we are to extract its benefits while avoiding its pitfalls.
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Opinion: The Problem with Preprints
Michael Mullins | Nov 1, 2021
Preprints can be valuable additions to the scientific literature. But we must start seeing them as perishable commodities rather than akin to peer-reviewed, published studies.
A conceptual illustration of computers, hands on mice, a virus
A Surge in Pandemic Research Shines a Spotlight on Preprints
Diana Kwon | Sep 10, 2021
Many scientists have turned to preprints to rapidly disseminate their research on COVID-19, but some disagree with this approach.
Illustration of a person confused looking at a computer
When Researchers Sound the Alarm on Problematic Papers
Shawna Williams | Sep 1, 2021
Finding and reporting an irregularity in a published study can lead people down an unexpected path.
Blue stethoscope resting on a pile of folders filled with papers
Ivermectin (Still) Lacks Scientific Support as a COVID-19 Drug
Catherine Offord | Aug 2, 2021
A Cochrane review bolsters scientists’ advice that ivermectin should not be used against the disease outside of clinical trials, while a study claiming to have found beneficial effects in patients was withdrawn following allegations of data manipulation.
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Opinion: The Rise of Preprints Is No Cause for Alarm
Jonny Coates | Apr 14, 2021
At a time of fast-paced science and rampant misinformation, can we trust the non–peer-reviewed literature?
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Opinion: Preprints in the Public Eye
Jigisha Patel | Mar 18, 2021
ASAPbio has developed resources for preprint servers, institutions, scientists, and journalists to promote the responsible reporting of research in the media.
Doctors Consider Convalescent T Cell Therapy for COVID-19
Abby Olena | Nov 6, 2020
Researchers propose that an infusion of memory T cells from people who have recovered from SARS-CoV-2 infections could treat severe disease.
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New Journal to Publish Reviews of COVID-19 Preprints
Amanda Heidt | Jun 29, 2020
The open access publication will use AI to identify the most pressing manuscripts in need of peer review.
Special Report
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Gender Gap in Research Output Widens During Pandemic
Katarina Zimmer | Jun 25, 2020
Experts identify childcare, which tends to fall to women, as one likely cause for the relative decrease in women’s scientific productivity compared with men’s.
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Opinion: Don’t Disparage the Pace of COVID-19 Research
John D. Loike and Salomon Amar | Jun 22, 2020
Fast science—with all its warts—is making unprecedented progress in the fight against COVID-19.
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Studies Report Rapid Loss of COVID-19 Antibodies
Amanda Heidt | Jun 19, 2020
The results, while preliminary, suggest that survivors of SARS-CoV-2 infection may be susceptible to reinfection within weeks or months.
special report
How (Not) to Do an Antibody Survey for SARS-CoV-2
Catherine Offord | Apr 28, 2020
Preprints from the first round of seroprevalence studies indicate that many more people have been infected with the virus than previously reported. Some of these studies also have serious design flaws.
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Journals, Peer Reviewers Cope with Surge in COVID-19 Publications
Claire Jarvis | Mar 17, 2020
Coronavirus experts are swamped with reading submissions, which they’re working through as quickly as possible.
Glycans May Bind to RNA, Initial Findings Suggest
Emily Makowski | Oct 7, 2019
This is the first time sugars have been found connected to RNA molecules, suggesting a new role for RNA.
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Q&A: New Preprint Server for Clinical Research
Chia-Yi Hou | Jun 5, 2019
The cofounder of bioRxiv, Richard Sever, discusses why there’s a need for the preprint server medRxiv that launched today.