A vole in a green grass field.
Voles Trim Tall Grass to Prevent Attacks
Mongolian rodents join the ranks of earthworms and beavers as known ecosystem engineers.
ABOVE: Guoliang Li
Voles Trim Tall Grass to Prevent Attacks
Voles Trim Tall Grass to Prevent Attacks

Mongolian rodents join the ranks of earthworms and beavers as known ecosystem engineers.

Mongolian rodents join the ranks of earthworms and beavers as known ecosystem engineers.

ABOVE: Guoliang Li

prey

black and white man on coast
Biophysicist Adrianus Kalmijn Dies at 88
Chloe Tenn | Jan 11, 2022
His work revealed that sharks use an electromagnetic sense to navigate and detect prey.
a microscope image of mouse fur
Some Mammals May Use Specialized Hairs to Detect Predators’ Heat
Amanda Heidt | Dec 16, 2021
When observed under a microscope, guard hairs from mice resemble optical sensors used in thermal cameras to detect heat, according to a new study.
How a Centipede Survives its Own Species’ Venom
Shawna Williams | Nov 1, 2020
The same toxin targets different receptors in prey and conspecifics to deliver either a lethal or non-lethal blow.
ogre-faced spider Deinopis spinosa metatarsal trichobothria evolution senses hearing vibration sound
This Ogre-Faced Spider Can Hear Prey Through Its Legs
Katarina Zimmer | Oct 29, 2020
The tropical net-casting spider Deinopis spinosa joins several other arachnid species that can hear sounds from afar without the help of a web, or even ears—an ability that aids its unique hunting tactics.
Mark Konishi, Pioneer of Studying Behavior’s Neural Basis, Dies
Ashley Yeager | Aug 14, 2020
The Caltech scientist was revered for his work on the neurobiology of birdsong and owls’ ability to home in on their prey.
Image of the Day: Bespectacled Mantis
Emily Makowski | Dec 10, 2019
Insects wearing 3-D glasses detect computer-generated prey.
Herennia multipuncta spider coloration evolution predator prey
Spider’s Orange Colors Both Lure Prey and Frighten Predators
Jake Buehler | Apr 22, 2019
Spotted coin spider colors are a Swiss army knife of deception, bringing food closer, and keeping assailants at bay.
Image of the Day: A Sticky Situation
The Scientist Staff | Jan 31, 2017
When a frog’s whip-like tongue hits its prey, its saliva becomes thick and sticky in order to grip the food.
Chameleons Catch Prey with Sticky Spit
Alison F. Takemura | Jun 22, 2016
The lizard’s saliva is thick enough to drag a cricket to its alimentary demise, scientists show.
Study: Small Fish Comforted By Big Predators
Tanya Lewis | Apr 28, 2016
Baby fish show fewer signs of stress in the presence of large fish that scare off midsize predators. 
Butterflies Weaponize Milkweed Toxins
Geoffrey Giller | Nov 4, 2015
Monarch and queen caterpillars store toxic compounds from their milkweed diet to ward off predators into adulthood, a new study suggests.
The Sea Hare’s Chemical Attack
Kate Yandell | Mar 29, 2013
The slug-like marine animals squirt a substance at lobsters that makes the predators lose their ability to smell.
Predator-Savvy Shark Embryos
Jef Akst | Jan 10, 2013
Bamboo sharks still developing in their egg cases respond to a predator presence by ceasing movement and even breathing.
Mites Remember Enemies, Fight Back
Dan Cossins | Oct 11, 2012
Mites that were attacked by rival species as juveniles attack the young of their former assailants more frequently when they reach adulthood.
Archaean Prey
Jef Akst | Mar 13, 2012
Animals can and do eat Archaea.