artistic representation of a jumping gene
Jumping Genes Can Cause Movement Disorder: Study
Mice with overactive LINE-1 retrotransposons in their brains exhibit movement difficulties, suggesting the genetic elements may play a role in ataxia in humans. 
Jumping Genes Can Cause Movement Disorder: Study
Jumping Genes Can Cause Movement Disorder: Study

Mice with overactive LINE-1 retrotransposons in their brains exhibit movement difficulties, suggesting the genetic elements may play a role in ataxia in humans. 

Mice with overactive LINE-1 retrotransposons in their brains exhibit movement difficulties, suggesting the genetic elements may play a role in ataxia in humans. 

Purkinje cells
The brain's cerebellum
The Cerebellum’s Functions in Cognition, Emotion, and More
Diana Kwon | Aug 15, 2022
Once thought of as a mere motor coordination center, the “little brain” is now appreciated as participating in higher neurological processes.
Mitochondria from Different Brain Cells Have Different Proteins
Jef Akst | Dec 1, 2019
Organelles isolated from two types of neurons and a nonneuronal astrocyte in the mouse cerebellum showed varying levels of proteins, hinting at functional differences.
Infographic: What’s in a Mitochondrion?
Jef Akst | Dec 1, 2019
A study finds variations in the levels of proteins for some important processes among organelles from different brain cells.
Neurons Live Longer in New Brains
Sabrina Richards | Feb 25, 2013
Transplanting mouse neurons into rats allows the neurons to survive twice as long as they would in mice.
The Complex Tissue Shop
Cristina Luiggi | Dec 7, 2011
Over the past decade, researchers at RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology in Japan have generated complex tissues, including mouse retinas and Purkinje cells (a type of neuron) that integrated appropriately into the mouse fetal brain.