Two bonobos facing each other on a tree branch
Q&A: In Battle of the Sexes, Dominance Doesn’t Always Equal Power
The Scientist spoke to hyena researcher Eve Davidian for a broad look at power relationships between male and female mammals.
ABOVE: Martin Surbeck
Q&A: In Battle of the Sexes, Dominance Doesn’t Always Equal Power
Q&A: In Battle of the Sexes, Dominance Doesn’t Always Equal Power

The Scientist spoke to hyena researcher Eve Davidian for a broad look at power relationships between male and female mammals.

The Scientist spoke to hyena researcher Eve Davidian for a broad look at power relationships between male and female mammals.

ABOVE: Martin Surbeck

Q&A

a research sailboat with white sails inscribed with "tara ocean" traverses a body of water with small, rocky islands in the background
Q&A: Thousands of RNA Viruses Newly Discovered in Ocean Water
Dan Robitzski | Apr 7, 2022
The Scientist spoke with Ohio State University microbiologist Matthew Sullivan about a recent expedition that identified thousands of RNA viruses from water samples and cataloged them into novel phylogenic groups.
Zebrafish with fluorescent nervous system in green.
Oust the Mouse: A Plan to Reduce Mammal Use in Drug Development
Natalia Mesa | Mar 15, 2022
The Scientist spoke to Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory’s Jim Strickland about the institute’s new MDI Bioscience initiative to perform more drug testing and development in nonmammalian models.
A fossilized skeleton of an ancient crocodile-like organism that lived in what’s now Brazil.
Q&A: Paleontology’s Colonial Legacy
Dan Robitzski | Mar 3, 2022
Archaeologist and paleontologist Juan Carlos Cisneros tells The Scientist that researchers frequently fail to involve local groups—and sometimes violate laws—when studying Latin American fossils.
Office building near water with white roof
Q&A: A Randomized Approach to Awarding Grants
Natalia Mesa | Feb 25, 2022
Denmark’s Novo Nordisk Foundation says it hopes that adding a randomization step to its award process will reduce implicit biases in selection and lead to funding more innovative, impactful research.
A stone statue of a medieval gatekeeper holding a spear upright. The clear sky is in the background.
Q&A: Psych and Neuro Journals Primarily Edited by American Men
Dan Robitzski | Feb 24, 2022
The Scientist spoke with University of California, San Francisco, neuroscientist Eleanor Palser about her study’s finding that women, especially those working outside the US, are underrepresented in some areas of academic publishing.
larva
Leaping Larvae Intrigue Scientists
Chloe Tenn | Jan 20, 2022
The Scientist spoke with entomologist Matt Bertone about the characteristics of Laemophloeus biguttatus larvae jumps—a previously unreported behavior in this group of beetles.
goldfish in tank
Researchers Train Goldfish to “Drive”
Chloe Tenn | Jan 12, 2022
The Scientist spoke with cognitive neuroscientist Ronen Segev about how he taught goldfish to maneuver a moveable tank over land toward a visual target.
indoor chicken farm
Avian Flu Case Numbers Soar in Europe
Chloe Tenn | Jan 7, 2022
The Scientist spoke with the UK’s chief veterinary officer, Christine Middlemiss, about this winter’s high bird flu prevalence, the effects of the disease, and efforts to combat it.
Miscellaneous diatoms, appearing as translucent blue and brownish circles and rhomboid shapes, are imaged in front of a black background.
Q&A: Fluorescence Lets Diatoms Communicate, Coordinate Behavior
Dan Robitzski | Dec 16, 2021
The Scientist spoke with physicist and microbial ecologist Idan Tuval, whose recent paper challenges the assumption that these single-celled organisms only communicate via chemical signals.
Magazines and stethoscope
Q&A: Potential Partiality in Scientific Publishing
Chloe Tenn | Nov 23, 2021
The Scientist interviewed clinical pharmacologist Clara Locher, coauthor of a new survey aimed at detecting editorial bias, regarding her team’s findings about biomedical publishing.
A ship off the coast of Antarctica approaches a beach
Q&A: How to Keep Antarctica Safe from Invasive Species
Dan Robitzski | Nov 23, 2021
The Scientist spoke with University of Wollongong ecologist Dana Bergstrom about protecting the continent’s native plants and animals in the face of climate change and a growing human presence.
snake eating another snake
Male Snakes Cannibalizing Females Present Evolutionary Puzzle
Chloe Tenn | Nov 15, 2021
The Scientist speaks with organismal biologist Xavier Glaudas about possible reasons for his recent finding that male Montpellier snakes cannibalize female conspecifics.
man standing in front of gene sequencing machines
Q&A: Nearly Every Single Human Gene Can Be Linked to Cancer
Dan Robitzski | Oct 29, 2021
The Scientist spoke with University of Liverpool aging and longevity researcher João Pedro de Magalhães about how human biases can influence scientific priorities and outcomes in genetics.
Chelonibia testudinaria barnacle on turtle shell
Some Barnacles Can Move Around to Improve Feeding Position
Chloe Tenn | Oct 6, 2021
The Scientist spoke with marine biologist and barnacle researcher John Zardus about why turtle barnacles—previously thought to be immobile—in fact slowly travel. He thinks the answer is food.
A memorial in Canada for child victims of residential schools
Q&A: The Transgenerational Effects of Indigenous Residential Schools
Amanda Heidt | Sep 30, 2021
The Scientist spoke with Evan Adams, a First Nations physician, about how the health legacy of oppressive government-owned schools, including his parents’ experiences, has influenced his own life.
hagfish slime on hands
Hagfish Slime Cells Tailored to Deter Predation
Chloe Tenn | Sep 28, 2021
The Scientist spoke with Chapman University’s Yu Zeng about his lab’s finding that the slime-producing cells of the slippery marine fish vary with the creature’s size, which may be an adaptation to thwart different predators.
brown and white calf stares straight into the camera with a surprised look
Potty Party: Researchers Show Young Cows Can Be Toilet-Trained
Annie Melchor | Sep 14, 2021
Ethologist Jan Langbein and his team trained the cattle as a way to keep solid and liquid cattle waste separate—with the goal of reducing ammonia emissions coming from livestock.
Two emergency responders stand near a barricade on a street in New York
Q&A: Health of 9/11 First Responders 20 Years Later
Amanda Heidt | Sep 7, 2021
The Scientist spoke with Rachel Zeig-Owens, the director of epidemiology for the World Trade Center Health Program, about what scientists have learned after two decades of studying illness and disease among survivors.
a male musk duck
Talking Duck Stuns Animal Behavior Researcher
Christie Wilcox | Sep 5, 2021
Leiden University’s Carel ten Cate tracked down 34-year-old duck recordings—and the man who made them—to verify that musk ducks are capable of vocal learning, an ability that hadn’t been thought to exist in waterfowl.