Bee Reports over the Past Century Indicate a Loss of Diversity
Bee Reports over the Past Century Indicate a Loss of Diversity
An analysis of museum data and naturalists' observations finds that the number of bee species recorded has been declining since the 1990s. The first global, long-term study of bee trends adds to mounting evidence that the pollinators are in trouble worldwide.
Bee Reports over the Past Century Indicate a Loss of Diversity
Bee Reports over the Past Century Indicate a Loss of Diversity

An analysis of museum data and naturalists' observations finds that the number of bee species recorded has been declining since the 1990s. The first global, long-term study of bee trends adds to mounting evidence that the pollinators are in trouble worldwide.

An analysis of museum data and naturalists' observations finds that the number of bee species recorded has been declining since the 1990s. The first global, long-term study of bee trends adds to mounting evidence that the pollinators are in trouble worldwide.

Q&A
Q&A: Natural History Museums’ Role in Pandemic Surveillance
Q&A: Natural History Museums’ Role in Pandemic Surveillance
Max Kozlov | Jan 21, 2021
Host vouchering, the practice of preserving species known to harbor infectious diseases, can be used to help determine a pathogen’s source, scientists say.
Q&A: Global Insect Declines Due to “Death by a Thousand Cuts”
Q&A: Global Insect Declines Due to “Death by a Thousand Cuts”
Asher Jones | Jan 15, 2021
University of Connecticut entomologist David Wagner speaks with The Scientist about his biggest concerns for global insect populations and recommendations for actions to help save these tiny but important creatures.
High Risk of Bias in Early COVID-19 Studies: Meta-Analysis
High Risk of Bias in Early COVID-19 Studies: Meta-Analysis
Max Kozlov | Jan 14, 2021
Few peer-reviewed clinical papers on the pandemic contained original data, and many of those that did had poor experimental design.
Q&A: Brown Fat Linked to Better Cardio and Metabolic Health
Q&A: Brown Fat Linked to Better Cardio and Metabolic Health
Amanda Heidt | Jan 12, 2021
Paul Cohen of the Rockefeller University describes his study of thousands of people, finding that the energy-burning tissue is tied to a lower risk of for several diseases, including type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease.
WHO Leads in Using Solid Science to Draft COVID-19 Policy: Study
WHO Leads in Using Solid Science to Draft COVID-19 Policy: Study
Max Kozlov | Jan 8, 2021
Governments are variable in their reliance on highly cited research, while international intergovernmental organizations such as the World Health Organization reliably link policy and science, according to an analysis of thousands of policy documents from the first half of 2020.
Identical Twins Accumulate Genetic Differences in the Womb
Identical Twins Accumulate Genetic Differences in the Womb
Catherine Offord | Jan 7, 2021
DNA replication errors during cell division cause monozygotic twins to diverge from each other even during the earliest stages of development, a new study finds.
What’s Killing Killer Whales? Autopsies Reveal a Role for Humans
What’s Killing Killer Whales? Autopsies Reveal a Role for Humans
Ashley Yeager | Dec 16, 2020
Stephen Raverty of the Ministry of Agriculture in Canada and Joseph Gaydos of UC Davis speak with The Scientist about their recent study assessing the causes of orca deaths.
Q&A: Tire Rubber Preservative Harms Coho Salmon, Study Suggests
Q&A: Tire Rubber Preservative Harms Coho Salmon, Study Suggests
Max Kozlov | Dec 7, 2020
6PPD, a tire preservative, reacts with ozone to produce a compound that the researchers say may be responsible for large die-off events.
Q&A: How Animals Change in Space
Q&A: How Animals Change in Space
Jef Akst | Nov 25, 2020
Weill Cornell Medicine geneticist Christopher Mason speaks with The Scientist about a bolus of new work on the physiological, cellular, and molecular effects of leaving Earth.