Q&A: Human Challenge Studies of COVID-19 Underway in UK
Q&A: Human Challenge Studies of COVID-19 Underway in UK
Researchers at Imperial College London and the University of Oxford are exposing healthy volunteers to SARS-CoV-2 for science.
Q&A: Human Challenge Studies of COVID-19 Underway in UK
Q&A: Human Challenge Studies of COVID-19 Underway in UK

Researchers at Imperial College London and the University of Oxford are exposing healthy volunteers to SARS-CoV-2 for science.

Researchers at Imperial College London and the University of Oxford are exposing healthy volunteers to SARS-CoV-2 for science.

Q&A
Survey Finds Lack of Diversity Among Journal Editors
Survey Finds Lack of Diversity Among Journal Editors
Jef Akst | Jun 14, 2021
Collecting data on the various races, sexual orientations, and gender identities of editors at 25 scientific and medical journals, researchers document the underrepresentation of minority groups.
Why Turkey’s Sea of Marmara Is Full of Marine Snot
Why Turkey’s Sea of Marmara Is Full of Marine Snot
Christie Wilcox | Jun 11, 2021
Turkish officials are scrambling to clean up a massive, gooey plankton bloom that’s sliming the country’s ports and could suffocate the area’s marine ecosystems.
How STEM Can Be More Inclusive of Scientists with Disabilities
How STEM Can Be More Inclusive of Scientists with Disabilities
Amanda Heidt | Jun 7, 2021
The culture of academia can make disabled scientists wary of disclosing their conditions or needs. Molecular biologist Justin Yerbury suggests how the system might become more inclusive. 
BioHub Network Aims to Advance Sharing of Pathogens for Research
BioHub Network Aims to Advance Sharing of Pathogens for Research
Shawna Williams | Jun 6, 2021
The World Health Organization–led program will promote equity in addition to facilitating access to samples, a WHO official involved in the project tells The Scientist.
Incest Isn’t Taboo in Nature: Study
Incest Isn’t Taboo in Nature: Study
Christie Wilcox | May 7, 2021
Avoiding inbreeding appears to be the exception rather than the norm for animals, according to a new meta-analysis of experimental studies.
Random Plane Boarding Minimizes COVID-19 Risk: Study
Random Plane Boarding Minimizes COVID-19 Risk: Study
Christie Wilcox | Apr 27, 2021
A modeling study of boarding behavior finds filling the plane from back to front extends the close contact time between passengers and therefore increases the risks posed by air travel.
Q&A: George Church’s Genome Up for Auction
Q&A: George Church’s Genome Up for Auction
Jef Akst | Apr 19, 2021
A founder of the field of synthetic biology is selling data from his own DNA as a nonfungible token, or NFT, through Nebula Genomics, a personal genome company he cofounded.
Conservation Biologists May Unintentionally Spread Pathogens
Conservation Biologists May Unintentionally Spread Pathogens
Amanda Heidt | Apr 19, 2021
When conservationists relocate species, they don’t always account for the pathogens hitching a ride, and the consequences of introducing them to a new environment.
New Report Dissects Ethics of Emerging Human Brain Cell Models
New Report Dissects Ethics of Emerging Human Brain Cell Models
Amanda Heidt | Apr 12, 2021
The National Academies’ report touches on ethical issues raised by new technologies such as brain organoids and human-animal chimeras, and suggests that current regulatory oversight is sufficient.
Q&A: New Tool Ranks Viruses by Their Risk of Jumping to Humans
Q&A: New Tool Ranks Viruses by Their Risk of Jumping to Humans
Jef Akst | Apr 9, 2021
Researchers involved in a long-term project to identify viruses of concern have now assessed the risk factors that could help forecast which pathogens are the most likely to spillover from wildlife to people.
Genetic Variants Tied to Sex Differences in Psychiatric Disorders
Genetic Variants Tied to Sex Differences in Psychiatric Disorders
Amanda Heidt | Mar 31, 2021
The largest study of its kind identifies single nucleotide polymorphisms with disparate effects on men’s and women’s susceptibility to conditions such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.
New Models Improve Long-Term Grass Pollen Forecasts
New Models Improve Long-Term Grass Pollen Forecasts
Asher Jones | Mar 26, 2021
More-accurate predictions of the severity of an upcoming grass pollen season based on rainfall and temperature could help allergy sufferers manage their symptoms.
Q&A: Data Gaps Hinder Monitoring of SARS-COV-2 Variants
Q&A: Data Gaps Hinder Monitoring of SARS-COV-2 Variants
Jef Akst | Mar 24, 2021
Martha Nelson of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases talks about the need to balance data sharing and patient privacy concerns when tracking the spread of variants.
Sex of Human Cells Matters in Studying Neurological Disease
Sex of Human Cells Matters in Studying Neurological Disease
Amanda Heidt | Mar 18, 2021
Authors of a new review urge researchers to consider how the chromosomal sex of a cell affects experiments in research on neurodegeneration.
Q&A: Unique Circumstances for Minority Scientists During COVID-19
Q&A: Unique Circumstances for Minority Scientists During COVID-19
Asher Jones | Mar 10, 2021
Investigators from underrepresented groups have borne the brunt of the disruption to science from the pandemic, according to an opinion piece that outlines ways in which institutions can lessen the damage.
Cuttlefish Delay Gratification, a Sign of Smarts
Cuttlefish Delay Gratification, a Sign of Smarts
Asher Jones | Mar 5, 2021
The cephalopods resisted temptation for up to 130 seconds to earn their favorite food, hinting at sophisticated cognitive abilities such as planning for the future.
Q&A: “Talk to a Scientist” Webinar Series for Kids
Q&A: “Talk to a Scientist” Webinar Series for Kids
Harini Barath | Mar 5, 2021
An interactive online forum keeps Indian kids busy with science while they are stuck indoors during the pandemic.
Q&A: A Molecular Toolkit to Build SARS-CoV-2 Research Capacity
Q&A: A Molecular Toolkit to Build SARS-CoV-2 Research Capacity
Asher Jones | Mar 3, 2021
Sam Wilson discusses a user-friendly set of resources that he and his collaborators developed to aid labs pivoting to study COVID-19.
From Nature Lover to Structural Biologist: A Scientist’s Journey
From Nature Lover to Structural Biologist: A Scientist’s Journey
Asher Jones | Feb 26, 2021
A gift of medical books from an unlikely source spurred Chrystal Starbird’s scientific career. She talks about what motivates her research on cell surface receptors and the obstacles she has faced as a Black woman in academia.