Editor&rsquo;s Picks of <em>The Scientist</em>&rsquo;s Best Infographics of 2020
Editor’s Picks of The Scientist’s Best Infographics of 2020
This year’s most captivating illustrations tell stories from the micro scale—such as newborn neurons in the adult brain and bacteria in the infant gut—to the scale of entire ecosystems, including reintroduced predators and rising seas.
Editor’s Picks of The Scientist’s Best Infographics of 2020
Editor’s Picks of The Scientist’s Best Infographics of 2020

This year’s most captivating illustrations tell stories from the micro scale—such as newborn neurons in the adult brain and bacteria in the infant gut—to the scale of entire ecosystems, including reintroduced predators and rising seas.

This year’s most captivating illustrations tell stories from the micro scale—such as newborn neurons in the adult brain and bacteria in the infant gut—to the scale of entire ecosystems, including reintroduced predators and rising seas.

rewilding
Can Rewilding Large Predators Regenerate Ecosystems?
Can Rewilding Large Predators Regenerate Ecosystems?
Katarina Zimmer | Nov 1, 2020
As some conservationists and researchers begin to return large carnivores to areas where they once roamed, scientists intensify efforts to study the ecological roles of predators.
Slideshow: How Ecologists Study the World&rsquo;s Apex Predators
Slideshow: How Ecologists Study the World’s Apex Predators
Katarina Zimmer | Nov 1, 2020
A global decline of large carnivores has motivated scientists to understand the animals’ ecological roles, and consider whether reintroducing them can help restore ecosystems.
Infographic: How Large Carnivores Sculpt Ecosystems
Infographic: How Large Carnivores Sculpt Ecosystems
Katarina Zimmer | Nov 1, 2020
The release of gray wolves in Yellowstone decades ago still stands as one of the few examples of a predator reintroduction, and the lessons learned continue to be debated. New projects aim to do it again.
How to Reintroduce a Long-Lost Species
How to Reintroduce a Long-Lost Species
Shawna Williams | Oct 20, 2020
Conservation biologist John Ewen discusses the recent reintroduction of Tasmanian devils to mainland Australia after a 3,000-year absence and issues that need to be considered when bringing long-departed animals back into an area.
Book Excerpt from <em>Rise of the Necrofauna</em>
Book Excerpt from Rise of the Necrofauna
Britt Wray | Sep 30, 2017
In chapter 4, “Why Recreate the Woolly Mammoth?” author Britt Wray explores the social consequences of bringing an iconic species back from extinction.
CRISPR May Prove Useful in De-Extinction Efforts
CRISPR May Prove Useful in De-Extinction Efforts
Britt Wray | Sep 1, 2017
Researchers are using the powerful gene-editing tool to recreate the woolly mammoth.
Your Brain on Art
Your Brain on Art
Mary Beth Aberlin | May 1, 2014
A new scientific discipline investigates the neurology underlying the experience and the creation of beauty.
Where the Wild Things Were
Where the Wild Things Were
Daniel Cossins | May 1, 2014
Conservationists are reintroducing large animals to areas they once roamed, providing ecologists with the chance to assess whether such “rewilding” efforts can restore lost ecosystems.
A Wilder Europe
A Wilder Europe
Daniel Cossins | Apr 30, 2014
An organization hopes to restore natural ecological processes by reintroducing large herbivores to the continent.