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Cross section of an organic cell with intracellular organelles
How Intracellular Bacteria Hijack Your Cells
Scientists studying pathogens such as Chlamydia, Legionella, and Listeria get a master class in how to control the internal workings of mammalian cells.
How Intracellular Bacteria Hijack Your Cells
How Intracellular Bacteria Hijack Your Cells

Scientists studying pathogens such as Chlamydia, Legionella, and Listeria get a master class in how to control the internal workings of mammalian cells.

Scientists studying pathogens such as Chlamydia, Legionella, and Listeria get a master class in how to control the internal workings of mammalian cells.

Schwann cells
Illustration showing how some intracellular bacteria, such as <em >Legionella pneumophila</em>, manipulate the cell&#39;s membranes for their own good
Infographic: Intracellular Bacteria’s Tricks for Host Manipulation 
Catherine Offord | Dec 1, 2022 | 2 min read
Various microbes, including several human pathogens, hijack the cell’s skeleton, membranes, and protein-making machinery to make themselves at home.
A nine-banded armadillo walking on dry grass.
Leprosy Bacterium Rejuvenates Armadillos’ Livers
Alejandra Manjarrez | Nov 15, 2022 | 4 min read
Mycobacterium leprae appeared to reprogram the animals’ livers to a state partially resembling early development, resulting in healthy organ growth.
Certain Glial Cells Appear to Help Prevent Muscle Fatigue
Ashley Yeager | May 1, 2018 | 3 min read
The flow of calcium and potassium ions keeps muscles contracting in the diaphragms of neonatal mice, but if a key protein receptor is missing, fatigue sets in more quickly.
Infographic: Getting Synapses Ready to Fire
Ashley Yeager | Apr 30, 2018 | 1 min read
A new study reveals more about the role of specialized Schwann cells at junctions between neurons and muscle cells.
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