A tearful black dog looks at the camera
Dogs Cry Tears of Joy: Study
Pet dogs produce a larger volume of tears when they are reunited with their owners than with acquaintances, possibly because of surging oxytocin levels—findings that could be the first evidence of emotional crying in nonhuman animals.
Dogs Cry Tears of Joy: Study
Dogs Cry Tears of Joy: Study

Pet dogs produce a larger volume of tears when they are reunited with their owners than with acquaintances, possibly because of surging oxytocin levels—findings that could be the first evidence of emotional crying in nonhuman animals.

Pet dogs produce a larger volume of tears when they are reunited with their owners than with acquaintances, possibly because of surging oxytocin levels—findings that could be the first evidence of emotional crying in nonhuman animals.

social interaction
Photo of John Calhoun crouches within his rodent utopia-turned-dystopia
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