SARS-CoV-2 Spike Protein Shares Sequence with a Human Protein
SARS-CoV-2 Spike Protein Shares Sequence with a Human Protein
Eight amino acids are identical to part of the human epithelial sodium channel, leading researchers to suspect the virus might interfere with the channel’s function.
SARS-CoV-2 Spike Protein Shares Sequence with a Human Protein
SARS-CoV-2 Spike Protein Shares Sequence with a Human Protein

Eight amino acids are identical to part of the human epithelial sodium channel, leading researchers to suspect the virus might interfere with the channel’s function.

Eight amino acids are identical to part of the human epithelial sodium channel, leading researchers to suspect the virus might interfere with the channel’s function.

sodium channel
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