Fruit fly on cactus leaf
Fruit Flies Evolve in Time with the Seasons: Study
Researchers find that evolution can operate on extraordinarily fast timescales.
ABOVE: © iStock.com, IMNATURE
Fruit Flies Evolve in Time with the Seasons: Study
Fruit Flies Evolve in Time with the Seasons: Study

Researchers find that evolution can operate on extraordinarily fast timescales.

Researchers find that evolution can operate on extraordinarily fast timescales.

ABOVE: © iStock.com, IMNATURE

stress

Black and white photo of Rechtschaffen looking at the camera
Pioneering Sleep Researcher Allan Rechtschaffen Dies at 93
Lisa Winter | Dec 22, 2021
Rechtschaffen sought to understand the evolutionary purpose of shut-eye.
babies
Sex Ratios at Birth Linked to Pollutants
Chloe Tenn | Dec 3, 2021
A large, long-term study across the US and Sweden finds potential correlations between specific pollutants and the proportions of male and female babies born.
False color image of two Caenorhabditis elegans roundworms; blue on a black background
Mitochondrial Stress Is Passed Between Generations
Amanda Heidt | Dec 1, 2021
Researchers identified a novel mechanism by which chemically induced stress is “remembered” by the mitochondria of worms more than 50 generations after the original trigger.
How C. elegans Transmit Stress Signals to Offspring
Infographic: How C. elegans Transmit Stress Signals to Offspring
Amanda Heidt | Dec 1, 2021
Neurons stressed with chemicals produce Wnt, which in turn triggers changes in the germline.
Rounded red and green fluorescent cells are visible on a light and dark gray background
Neurons Firing Together Generate Spontaneous Pain
Abby Olena | Nov 10, 2021
Abnormal sympathetic neuron growth leads to simultaneous activation of clusters of sensory neurons, causing the difficult-to-treat sensation.
Stress Paralyzes Immune Cells
Emma Yasinski | Jul 1, 2021
Scientists show that an influx of noradrenaline can halt immune cells in mice.
An illustration of a woman in bed unable to sleep. The bedside clock reads 2:30. Her brain and heart are glowing.
Infographic: Pathways from Noise to Cardiovascular Damage
Thomas Münzel, Omar Hahad | Jun 1, 2021
Research in mice and humans points to oxidative stress and inflammation as likely drivers of noise-induced health effects such as hypertension and heart disease.
Broken Heart Syndrome Linked to the Brain
Amanda Heidt | Jun 1, 2021
A chronically stressed amygdala can prime the heart to overreact to acute stress events, a new study shows.
Clip art of a crane, car, and plane flying over a city outside the window of two people in bed not sleeping, with a starry night background
How Environmental Noise Harms the Cardiovascular System
Thomas Münzel, Omar Hahad | Jun 1, 2021
Sound from cars, aircraft, trains, and other man-made machines is more than just annoying. It increases the risk of cardiovascular disease.
two tomato plants in pots viewed from the top, one scraggly with yellow leaves and one healthier-looking
Stress-Response Compound Widespread in Animals Is Found in Plants
Shawna Williams | May 22, 2021
TMAO appears to both stabilize other plant proteins and influence the expression of stress-response genes, researchers report.
High Stress Hormone Levels Halt Mouse Fur Growth
Jef Akst | Apr 1, 2021
Corticosterone interferes with signaling in the skin that normally activates hair follicle stem cells, possibly explaining the link between stress and hair loss.
Ten Minute Sabbatical
Emily Cox and Henry Rathvon | Apr 1, 2021
Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.
early-life stress, histone, chromatin, epigenetics, epigenetic modification, methylation, DNA, protein, stress, adversity, mice, genetics, genomics
Early-Life Stress Exerts Long-Lasting Effects Via Epigenome
Asher Jones | Mar 18, 2021
In mice, epigenetic marks made on histones during infancy influence depression-like behavior during adulthood. A drug that reverses the genomic tags appears to undo the damage.
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Jul 13, 2020
Meet some of the people featured in the July/August 2020 issue of The Scientist.
Losing Touch: Another Drawback of the COVID-19 Pandemic
Ashley Yeager | May 19, 2020
Affectionate touches tap into the nervous system’s rest and digest mode, reducing the release of stress hormones, bolstering the immune system, and stimulating brainwaves linked with relaxation.
Infographic: The Neurobiology of Suicidal Behavior
Catherine Offord | Jan 13, 2020
Clues about the biological mechanisms that contribute to a person’s chance of contemplating or attempting suicide
Oded Rechavi Studies the RNA Nematodes Pass to Their Offspring
Emily Makowski | Jan 13, 2020
The Tel Aviv University researcher is interested in how the macromolecules affect the health and behavior of successive generations of worms.
What Neurobiology Can Tell Us About Suicide
Catherine Offord | Jan 13, 2020
The biochemical mechanisms in the brain underlying suicidal behavior are beginning to come to light, and researchers hope they could one day lead to better treatment and prevention strategies.
Bruce McEwen
Bruce McEwen, Stress Hormone Researcher, Dies
Emily Makowski | Jan 6, 2020
The Rockefeller University neuroendocrinologist made landmark discoveries on how hormones affect brain structure.