False color image of two Caenorhabditis elegans roundworms; blue on a black background
Mitochondrial Stress Is Passed Between Generations
Researchers identified a novel mechanism by which chemically induced stress is “remembered” by the mitochondria of worms more than 50 generations after the original trigger.
ABOVE: iStock.com HeitiPaves
Mitochondrial Stress Is Passed Between Generations
Mitochondrial Stress Is Passed Between Generations

Researchers identified a novel mechanism by which chemically induced stress is “remembered” by the mitochondria of worms more than 50 generations after the original trigger.

Researchers identified a novel mechanism by which chemically induced stress is “remembered” by the mitochondria of worms more than 50 generations after the original trigger.

ABOVE: iStock.com HeitiPaves

stress response

How C. elegans Transmit Stress Signals to Offspring
Infographic: How C. elegans Transmit Stress Signals to Offspring
Amanda Heidt | Dec 1, 2021
Neurons stressed with chemicals produce Wnt, which in turn triggers changes in the germline.
oil in water
Stress-Induced Molecular Globs Boost Bacterial Fitness
Ruth Williams | Oct 21, 2021
Liquid conglomerations of molecules that form in bacterial cells in response to stress promote the cells’ survival, a study finds.
A Black woman stands in profile with her head turned towards the camera, smiling
Bianca Jones Marlin Traces How Sensory Inputs Shape the Brain
Annie Melchor | Oct 1, 2021
The Columbia University neuroscientist researches the biology behind some of our most human experiences, including building family relationships. 
Stress Paralyzes Immune Cells
Emma Yasinski | Jul 1, 2021
Scientists show that an influx of noradrenaline can halt immune cells in mice.
An illustration of a woman in bed unable to sleep. The bedside clock reads 2:30. Her brain and heart are glowing.
Infographic: Pathways from Noise to Cardiovascular Damage
Thomas Münzel, Omar Hahad | Jun 1, 2021
Research in mice and humans points to oxidative stress and inflammation as likely drivers of noise-induced health effects such as hypertension and heart disease.
Clip art of a crane, car, and plane flying over a city outside the window of two people in bed not sleeping, with a starry night background
How Environmental Noise Harms the Cardiovascular System
Thomas Münzel, Omar Hahad | Jun 1, 2021
Sound from cars, aircraft, trains, and other man-made machines is more than just annoying. It increases the risk of cardiovascular disease.
two tomato plants in pots viewed from the top, one scraggly with yellow leaves and one healthier-looking
Stress-Response Compound Widespread in Animals Is Found in Plants
Shawna Williams | May 22, 2021
TMAO appears to both stabilize other plant proteins and influence the expression of stress-response genes, researchers report.
High Stress Hormone Levels Halt Mouse Fur Growth
Jef Akst | Apr 1, 2021
Corticosterone interferes with signaling in the skin that normally activates hair follicle stem cells, possibly explaining the link between stress and hair loss.
Losing Touch: Another Drawback of the COVID-19 Pandemic
Ashley Yeager | May 19, 2020
Affectionate touches tap into the nervous system’s rest and digest mode, reducing the release of stress hormones, bolstering the immune system, and stimulating brainwaves linked with relaxation.
Infographic: The Neurobiology of Suicidal Behavior
Catherine Offord | Jan 13, 2020
Clues about the biological mechanisms that contribute to a person’s chance of contemplating or attempting suicide
What Neurobiology Can Tell Us About Suicide
Catherine Offord | Jan 13, 2020
The biochemical mechanisms in the brain underlying suicidal behavior are beginning to come to light, and researchers hope they could one day lead to better treatment and prevention strategies.
Bruce McEwen
Bruce McEwen, Stress Hormone Researcher, Dies
Emily Makowski | Jan 6, 2020
The Rockefeller University neuroendocrinologist made landmark discoveries on how hormones affect brain structure.
Infographic: Paraspeckle Form and Function
Archa Fox | Dec 1, 2019
What do scientists know about this membraneless nuclear body discovered less than two decades ago?
What Paraspeckles Can Teach Us About Basic Cell Biology
Archa Fox | Dec 1, 2019
Discovering a new type of subnuclear body taught me how pursuing the unexpected can lead to new insights—in this case, about long noncoding RNAs and liquid-liquid phase separation in cells.
Time Spent in Nature Is Good for You
Jef Akst | Oct 1, 2019
Research has repeatedly suggested that spending time in natural environments improves mental and physical well-being. Now, scientists are gathering the data needed to incorporate this phenomenon in health-care guidelines.
Bone Hormone Sparks Fight-or-Flight Response in Mice
Ruth Williams | Sep 12, 2019
A brain-activated, bone-derived hormone called osteocalcin regulates the acute stress response in rodents and possibly humans.
Bacterial Cell Envelope Size is Key to Membrane Stress Response
Diana Kwon | Mar 1, 2018
Transmission of stress signals in E. coli is dependent on the distance between its inner and outer membranes.
Planting Independence: A Profile of Katayoon Dehesh
Anna Azvolinsky | Feb 1, 2018
After a harrowing escape from Iran, Dehesh never shied away from difficult choices to pursue a career in plant biology.
Book Excerpt from Jane on the Brain
Wendy Jones | Nov 30, 2017
In chapter 3, “The Sense of Sensibility,” author Wendy Jones uses scenes from one of Jane Austen’s most celebrated novels to illustrate the functioning of the body’s stress response system.