Denisovan Fossil Identified in Tibetan Cave
Denisovan Fossil Identified in Tibetan Cave
A mandible dating to 160,000 years ago is the first evidence of Denisovan hominins outside the Russian cave where they were first discovered in 2010.
Denisovan Fossil Identified in Tibetan Cave
Denisovan Fossil Identified in Tibetan Cave

A mandible dating to 160,000 years ago is the first evidence of Denisovan hominins outside the Russian cave where they were first discovered in 2010.

A mandible dating to 160,000 years ago is the first evidence of Denisovan hominins outside the Russian cave where they were first discovered in 2010.

Tibet
Humans Made Tools Atop the Tibetan Plateau More than 30,000 Years Ago
Humans Made Tools Atop the Tibetan Plateau More than 30,000 Years Ago
Shawna Williams | Mar 1, 2019
A finding pushes back the timeline on humankind’s conquest of one of Earth’s harshest environments, and may provide clues about interactions with their hominin relatives.
Ancient Andeans Had Novel Genetic Advantages to Adapt to Altitude
Ancient Andeans Had Novel Genetic Advantages to Adapt to Altitude
Ashley Yeager | Oct 19, 2018
Unlike other populations living at high altitude, Andeans didn’t rely on hypoxia-related genes.
The Genetic Strategies of Dealing with High Altitude
The Genetic Strategies of Dealing with High Altitude
Abby Olena | Nov 2, 2017
Andean highlander genomes possess cardiovascular-related variants, while populations from other regions evolved different solutions to manage the lack of oxygen.
Playing the Field
Playing the Field
George B. Schaller | Dec 1, 2012
The role of field biologists is changing as conservation biology evolves and ecological challenges mount.
Contributors
Contributors
Beth Marie Mole | Dec 1, 2012
Meet some of the people featured in the December 2012 issue of The Scientist.
Book Excerpt from Tibet Wild
Book Excerpt from Tibet Wild
George B. Schaller | Dec 1, 2012
In the introduction to his latest book, renowned naturalist George Schaller describes the evolving role of the field biologist through the lens of his experiences with Himalayan wildlife.