Colorful cells connected by thin tubes
SARS-CoV-2 Could Use Nanotubes to Infect the Brain
Stressed cells can form hollow actin bridges to neighbors to get help, but the virus may hijack these tiny tunnels for its own purposes, a study suggests.
SARS-CoV-2 Could Use Nanotubes to Infect the Brain
SARS-CoV-2 Could Use Nanotubes to Infect the Brain

Stressed cells can form hollow actin bridges to neighbors to get help, but the virus may hijack these tiny tunnels for its own purposes, a study suggests.

Stressed cells can form hollow actin bridges to neighbors to get help, but the virus may hijack these tiny tunnels for its own purposes, a study suggests.

viral entry
Sex Differences in Immune Responses to Viral Infection
Catherine Offord | Mar 1, 2021
Stronger interferon production, greater T cell activation, and increased susceptibility to autoimmunity are just some of the ways that females seem to differ from males.
Infographic: How SARS-CoV-2 Immune Responses May Differ by Sex
Catherine Offord | Mar 1, 2021
Males and females show differences in gene expression, cell activation, and antibody production in response to some viral infections, but whether these influence COVID-19 outcomes is still unclear.
SARS-CoV-2 Exits Cells Via Lysosomes
Abby Olena | Nov 13, 2020
A study finds that β-coronaviruses don’t use the normal secretory pathway, a possible explanation for some aspects of COVID-19 pathology.
The Brain’s Immune Cells Stand Sentinel Against Viral Invasion
Ashley Yeager | Oct 1, 2020
Some viruses, possibly even SARS-CoV-2, can sneak into the brain through the nose. Recent studies show that microglia are ready for them when they do.
Why Some COVID-19 Cases Are Worse than Others
Katarina Zimmer | Feb 24, 2020
Emerging data as well as knowledge from the SARS and MERS coronavirus outbreaks yield some clues as to why SARS-CoV-2 affects some people worse than others.
Some Viruses May Infect by Inserting Different Portions of Genetic Material
Emma Yasinski | Mar 18, 2019
Viruses that infect plants and occasionally insects appear to cause infection with a divide-and-conquer strategy, multiplying separate segments of genetic material in different host cells.
Novel Hantavirus Infection Method
Bob Grant | Jul 3, 2015
Researchers find that the potentially deadly virus uses cholesterol to gain access to cells.