Image of nerve fibers shown in green and red
Neurons Simplify Visual Signals by Responding to Only One Retina
Mice have neurons that connect to both eyes but only propagate the signal from one or the other, simplifying the information sent to the cerebral cortex.
ABOVE: © MAX PLANCK INSTITUTE OF NEUROBIOLOGY / FERNHOLZ
Neurons Simplify Visual Signals by Responding to Only One Retina
Neurons Simplify Visual Signals by Responding to Only One Retina

Mice have neurons that connect to both eyes but only propagate the signal from one or the other, simplifying the information sent to the cerebral cortex.

Mice have neurons that connect to both eyes but only propagate the signal from one or the other, simplifying the information sent to the cerebral cortex.

ABOVE: © MAX PLANCK INSTITUTE OF NEUROBIOLOGY / FERNHOLZ
visual processing
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