ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
Photo of Makio Murayama
Handmade Hemoglobin, 1912-2012
Makio Murayama, a Japanese-American biochemist who was turned away from the Manhattan Project due to his heritage, rose to prominence for his work uncovering the link between the structure of hemoglobin and the mechanisms of sickle cell disease.
Handmade Hemoglobin, 1912-2012
Handmade Hemoglobin, 1912-2012

Makio Murayama, a Japanese-American biochemist who was turned away from the Manhattan Project due to his heritage, rose to prominence for his work uncovering the link between the structure of hemoglobin and the mechanisms of sickle cell disease.

Makio Murayama, a Japanese-American biochemist who was turned away from the Manhattan Project due to his heritage, rose to prominence for his work uncovering the link between the structure of hemoglobin and the mechanisms of sickle cell disease.

WWII
Older woman with hat and pink blouse smiling at camera.
Anne Beaumanoir, Activist and Clinical Neurologist, Dies at 98
Natalia Mesa | Mar 29, 2022 | 3 min read
Beaumanoir helped Jews evade Nazis during World War II and aided resistance fighters during the Algerian War of Independence. She also contributed to the field of epileptology.
Action at a Distance, Circa Early 1950s
Diana Kwon | Dec 1, 2020 | 3 min read
Neuroscientist Rita Levi-Montalcini began her Nobel Prize–winning work in a makeshift laboratory in Italy during the Second World War.
The Father of Autoimmunity: A Profile of Noel Rose
Diana Kwon | Jun 1, 2020 | 10 min read
By revealing that animals could develop immune responses against their own tissues, the physician-scientist established an entirely new field of science.
Those We Lost in 2019
Ashley Yeager | Dec 30, 2019 | 6 min read
The scientific community said goodbye to Sydney Brenner, Paul Greengard, Patricia Bath, and a number of other leading researchers this year.
Defining Rare Disorders: A Profile of Judith Hall
Anna Azvolinsky | Sep 1, 2019 | 8 min read
By bringing genetics into clinical medicine, the University of British Columbia medical geneticist helped to identify the gene mutations responsible for many rare diseases.
Neurobiologist Paul Greengard Dies
Ashley Yeager | Apr 15, 2019 | 3 min read
The Nobel laureate revolutionized our understanding of how brain cells communicate.
Walter Munk, “Einstein of the Oceans,” Dies
Ashley Yeager | Feb 12, 2019 | 3 min read
The marine scientist was renowned for his passion for exploring waves, marine life, and the way Earth’s largest bodies of water affect the planet’s climate.
headshot of Osamu Shimomura
GFP Discoverer Osamu Shimomura Dies
Shawna Williams | Oct 23, 2018 | 2 min read
The 90-year-old marine biologist won a Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his isolation of green fluorescent protein.
Donald Seldin, “Intellectual Father” of UT Southwestern, Dies
Jim Daley | May 8, 2018 | 2 min read
The physician-scientist recruited future Nobel Prize winners to build the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas into a first-rate institution. 
Chance and Necessity
Sean B. Carroll | Nov 1, 2013 | 3 min read
War and justice brought together two of the greatest minds of the 20th century, a scientist and a writer.
Contributors
Abby Olena | Nov 1, 2013 | 3 min read
Meet some of the people featured in the November 2013 issue of The Scientist.
Book Excerpt from Brave Genius
Sean B. Carroll | Oct 31, 2013 | 4 min read
In Chapter 20, “On the Same Path,” author Sean Carroll describes the initial meeting between Nobel Laureates Jacques Monod and Albert Camus.
ADVERTISEMENT