Features

Stem Cells... An Emerging Portrait
Ricki Lewis(rlewis@the-scientist.com) | Jul 3, 2005
Human embryonic stem cells remain the focus of an ever-intensifying public debate that blurs the limits of biology, confusing cultured tissues with children, and blastocysts descended from fertilized ova with those derived from somatic cell nuclei.
Tricks For Human Embryonic Stem Cells
Jeffrey Perkel(jperkel@the-scientist.com) | Jul 3, 2005
Your stem cells have just arrived.
Trials of the Heart
Christopher Thomas Scott(cscott@the-scientist.com) | Jul 3, 2005
Adult human stem cells may offer the opportunity to use one of biomedical science's most promising technologies without the ethical dilemmas of embryonic cells.

About Us

Meet This Issue's Contributors
Meet This Issue's Contributors
wrote a case note on the first-ever biotech patent case, which involved a genetically engineered bacterium that consumed oil spills.

Editorial

All Misdeeds Great and Small
All Misdeeds Great and Small
A clutch of research misconduct stories has hit the news in recent weeks.

Letter

Conflicts of interest at the NIH
Conflicts of interest at the NIH
Since when is moral and ethical conduct required to be efficient and helpful?
How to fix peer review
How to fix peer review
Re: "How to fix peer review."1 Your solution would certainly change the system, although I wonder if it might not exacerbate the existence of "camps" or "cliques" within each discipline. All one would need to do is get like-minded reviewers and then find a like-minded review editor at a journal.Michael Crichton suggested in State of Fear that two or three environmental research grants should be given to separate research groups to examine the same thing simultaneously – hopefully without e
Not all winners wear red
Not all winners wear red
With reference to "Red in tooth and claw, and football shirts," the team with the most championships in any sport is the New York Yankees, and they wear pin-stripes.

Opinion

A Manhattan Project for Bioterrorism
A Manhattan Project for Bioterrorism
A new "Manhattan Project" to combat bioterrorism has been proposed by US Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist and many others.

Notebook

Pro-intelligent design thesis stalls...
Pro-intelligent design thesis stalls...
Bryan Leonard, a PhD candidate in science education at Ohio State University (OSU), was scheduled to defend his thesis, which pits evolutionary science against intelligent design, on June 6.
Science lies still
Science lies still
Earlier this year, Dorota Tataruch spent two months lying around in bed with her feet up, 24 hours a day, all in the name of science.
... And Smithsonian has ID troubles
... And Smithsonian has ID troubles
late last month, but it is feeling less than privileged after the controversy surrounding the showing.

Vision

Under The Microscope
Under The Microscope
A global effort is underway to determine whether embryonic stem cells can be used to treat a variety of conditions, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and Parkinson disease.

Hot Paper

-Secretase Makes a Splash
-Secretase Makes a Splash
It started as a matter of guilt by association.

Briefs

Toxins harm descendants' fertility
Toxins harm descendants' fertility
US researchers have evidence that damage to mammalian male fertility caused by transient exposure of embryos to endocrine-disrupting environmental toxins can be passed down to subsequent generations.1 "The endocrine disruptors appear to have altered the remethylation and permanently reprogrammed the germ line, that is, sperm," explains study coauthor Michael Skinner of Washington State University in Pullman.Skinner and colleagues exposed female rats in mid gestation to high doses of two endocrin
Reward biochemistry linked to Clock
Reward biochemistry linked to Clock
gene is involved in regulating the brain's dopaminergic reward pathway.
Genes jumping in the brain
Genes jumping in the brain
Genetic elements that jump around the genome can influence brain circuitry, according to US researchers.

Technology

You Need It, They Build It
You Need It, They Build It
David Profitt was a little confused when a developmental biologist walked into his engineering shop and asked if Profitt could make an automated embryo sorter using a Fax machine.
Automated Colony Pickers Evolve
Automated Colony Pickers Evolve
Everyone knows that the first genome sequencing projects took years of work and represent the combined product of tens of thousands of individual fragments.
Fish Eggs Spawn a DNA Delivery Revolution
Fish Eggs Spawn a DNA Delivery Revolution
Atlantic salmon seems an unlikely source of inspiration for a research gadget.

Tools and Technology

Whole-Genome Genotyping on Microarrays
Whole-Genome Genotyping on Microarrays
To map most of the genetic variation in the human genome, scientists need to look at several hundred thousand single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) per individual.
Mass Spec Turned on its Ear
Mass Spec Turned on its Ear
Applied Biosystems of Foster City, Calif., has released a MALDI-TOF/TOF instrument that, according to the company, offers a 10-fold increase in sensitivity over current models.

BioBusiness

How To Hire The Right People The First Time
How To Hire The Right People The First Time
The new CEO of a small private biotechnology company had failed to keep the board up-to-date on what was going on inside the company.
Dueling Databases
Dueling Databases
Celera Genomics made hundreds of millions of dollars by selling access to its proprietary genome sequence information.
European Biotechs Face a Cash Crunch
European Biotechs Face a Cash Crunch
European biotech companies are more likely than their American counterparts to fail at the 3- to 5-year stage, according to a UK-based think tank.

Update

Scientists demand action on climate
Scientists demand action on climate
Scientific academies from the world's leading nations issued an unprecedented joint statement in June urging the leaders of their countries to commit to taking prompt action to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases.
Oxford ponders how to replace director of ancient-DNA lab
Oxford ponders how to replace director of ancient-DNA lab
The University of Oxford is considering what to do about replacing the director of a high-profile center for studying ancient DNA, who resigned in the wake of an investigation into his conduct, according to a spokesperson.

Reverse Transcript

Sapping Cancer's Energy
Sapping Cancer's Energy
Craig Thompson didn't set out to be a spokesman for the importance of bioenergetics in determining cell fate.