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A photo of soybeans
The Right Chemistry, 1935
Percy Lavon Julian, a young, Black scientist working in Jim Crow America, gained international recognition after beating chemists at the University of Oxford in the race to synthesize the alkaloid physostigmine, used for decades as a treatment for glaucoma.
The Right Chemistry, 1935
The Right Chemistry, 1935

Percy Lavon Julian, a young, Black scientist working in Jim Crow America, gained international recognition after beating chemists at the University of Oxford in the race to synthesize the alkaloid physostigmine, used for decades as a treatment for glaucoma.

Percy Lavon Julian, a young, Black scientist working in Jim Crow America, gained international recognition after beating chemists at the University of Oxford in the race to synthesize the alkaloid physostigmine, used for decades as a treatment for glaucoma.

African American
Skin Sheltered from Sunlight Still Gathers UV-Linked Mutations
Abby Olena, PhD | Jan 14, 2021 | 3 min read
Whole-genome sequencing reveals a wide range of UV-induced DNA changes in human skin cells, and lighter skin collects more mutations, sometimes to “sky high” levels.
Initiative Addresses Racial Disparities in Neuroscience
Amanda Heidt | Dec 1, 2020 | 4 min read
The African Ancestry Neuroscience Research Initiative plans to boost inclusion in genomic studies and support a more diverse generation of neuroscientists.
slavery, human population genetics, 23andMe, genomics, African American, Black history, history
African American Genomes Yield Insight into Slavery Practices
Amanda Heidt | Jul 23, 2020 | 5 min read
A massive study finds that regional differences in how slaves were treated throughout the Americas are reflected in the DNA of present-day Americans of African descent.
Open Letter
african american scientist science diversity inclusion
An Open Letter: Scientists and Racial Justice
Joseph Graves and Erich D. Jarvis | Jun 19, 2020 | 10+ min read
What we can and must do to make science more equitable.
Image of the Day: White Blood Cell Webs
Emily Makowski | Sep 5, 2019 | 1 min read
Neutrophil extracellular traps may hold clues to the cause of skin lesions in patients with a painful condition called hidradenitis suppurativa.
Study Finds No Race or Gender Bias in Grant Peer Review
Shawna Williams | Jun 1, 2018 | 2 min read
The paper’s authors say bias may nevertheless be present in other steps of the granting process.
Image of the Day: Henrietta Lacks
The Scientist Staff | May 12, 2018 | 1 min read
A painting of the woman who was the source of HeLa cells will be on view at the National Portrait Gallery beginning May 15.
Diversity Lacking in US Academia: Study
Bob Grant | Aug 22, 2017 | 1 min read
STEM faculties at public universities have an underrepresentation of African Americans, Hispanics, and women, but there are signs of change.
On Race, Gender, and NIH Funding
Bob Grant | Aug 1, 2016 | 2 min read
The results of two studies suggest slightly different biases in the review of National Institutes of Health R01 grant applications from minority and/or women researchers.
Telomeres Show Signs of Early-Life Stress
Rina Shaikh-Lesko | Apr 7, 2014 | 3 min read
Reduction in telomere length is associated with stress early on in life and may have a genetic component, researchers find.
Opinion: A Diverse Perspective
W. Malcolm Byrnes | Jul 29, 2013 | 4 min read
Progress in science is dependent on the diversity of its workforce.
Opinion: On Being an “African-American Scientist”
Raynard S. Kington | Mar 5, 2013 | 3 min read
If African-American researchers are ever to gain equal opportunities in science, even subtle cases of differential treatment must be stamped out.
NIH Tackles Racism
Bob Grant | Jun 25, 2012 | 1 min read
An advisory committee urges the federal funding agency to take steps to counter racial bias in the granting process.
NIH Biased Against Blacks?
Bob Grant | Aug 22, 2011 | 2 min read
A new study reveals that African American researchers are 10 percent less likely to receive funding from the federal agency than their white peers.
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