Kentish plover standing by nest with eggs
Avian Deception More Widespread Than Previously Thought
The broken-wing display, in which birds fake being wounded to protect their nests from predators, is found across the avian phylogenetic tree, a study finds.
Avian Deception More Widespread Than Previously Thought
Avian Deception More Widespread Than Previously Thought

The broken-wing display, in which birds fake being wounded to protect their nests from predators, is found across the avian phylogenetic tree, a study finds.

The broken-wing display, in which birds fake being wounded to protect their nests from predators, is found across the avian phylogenetic tree, a study finds.

animal behavior
An intact scorpion claw-in-claw with an autotomized one
Constipation’s Effect on Scorpion Sex Garners Biology Ig Nobel
Christie Wilcox | Sep 16, 2022
Other winners of this year’s prizes include research on the physics of ducklings and the therapeutic potential of ice cream.
bird perched next to brick atop trash can
Science Snapshot: Fine Feathered Foes
Lisa Winter | Sep 14, 2022
Australians are resorting to increasingly drastic measures to keep cockatoos out of their garbage bins.
Brightly colored intersecting lines, creating a chaotic pattern that resembles a subway map.
Monkeys Look for Patterns that Aren’t There—Just Like Humans Do
Dan Robitzski | Aug 31, 2022
Macaques continued to search for answers to an unsolvable laboratory task, seemingly refusing to believe that the correct answers were random and inconsistent.
dead bee surrounded by yellow flower petals
Science Snapshot: One Insect’s Corpse Is Another’s Breakfast
Lisa Winter | Aug 31, 2022
Though it’s poetic to say that ants were grieving the bee at a funeral, the reality is a bit more prosaic.
Cover of When Animals Dream: A colourful illustration of an octopus.<br><br>
Book Excerpt from When Animals Dream
David M. Peña-Guzmán | Aug 25, 2022
In Chapter 1, “The Science of Animal Dreams,” author David M. Peña-Guzmán relays the history of researchers digging into the mental realities of nonhuman brains.
A black dog with tearful eyes looks at the camera
Dogs Cry Tears of Joy: Study
Christie Wilcox | Aug 22, 2022
Pet dogs produce a larger volume of tears when they are reunited with their owners than with acquaintances, possibly because of surging oxytocin levels—findings that could be the first evidence of emotional crying in nonhuman animals.
Cover of When Animals Dream: A colourful illustration of an octopus.<br><br>
Opinion: Animal Dreaming Should Give Us Ethical Pause
David M. Peña-Guzmán | Aug 15, 2022
Research shows that humans aren’t the only animals whose imaginations run wild while they sleep.
old dog smiles at camera
Inside the Brains of Aging Dogs
Lesley Evans Ogden, Knowable Magazine | Aug 1, 2022
In a citizen science project, thousands of pet dogs are helping scientists to understand what happens to memory and cognition in old age.
Male common fruit fly (Drosophila Melanogaster) - about 2 mm long - sitting on a blade of grass with green foliage background
The Sex Appeal of Symmetric Songs
Mary Bates | Aug 1, 2022
Female fruit flies assess the physical symmetry of male suitors through the songs they sing, a study claims.
A dolphin comes out of the water to catch a red ball.<br><br>
Dolphins May Remember Personal Experiences
Alejandra Manjarrez | Jul 29, 2022
Bottlenose dolphins can recall trivial details of a prior event to later solve a novel task, a study finds, suggesting these mammals are capable of episodic memory.
A whale's upper body landing on a fishing boat
Why Did This Whale Smack Into a Boat?
Amanda Heidt | Jul 26, 2022
Collisions with small craft are rare, but there are conditions that can make these encounters more likely.
mouse nose peeking out from between two yellow objects
Not-so-Mellow Yellow: Pregnant Mice’s Urine Stresses Out Males
Sophie Fessl | Jun 20, 2022
An odorant found in the pee of pregnant mice—and in bananas—induces stress but also relieves pain in male mice, a study shows.
A pair of zebra finches in a cage
Animal Divorce: When and Why Pairs Break Up
Catherine Offord | Jun 1, 2022
Many species of birds and other vertebrates form pair bonds and mate with just one other individual for much of their lives. But the unions don’t always work out. Scientists want to know the underlying factors.
Infographic showing genetic and social monogamy in birds
Infographic: A New Look at Monogamy Across the Animal Kingdom
Catherine Offord | Jun 1, 2022
Advances in genetics in recent years has revealed that many apparently exclusive pairs in fact sometimes mate with individuals other than their partner, but social monogamy is widespread.
Octopus in tank lined with black dots
Do Invertebrates Have Emotions?
Natalia Mesa | May 26, 2022
And how do scientists go about answering that question?
Salamander on log
Science Snapshot: Free Fallin’ Salamanders
Lisa Winter | May 26, 2022
Arboreal salamanders use skydiving techniques to avoid smashing to the ground after a fall.
two muskoxen headbutting
Muskoxen Headbutts May Cause Brain Damage: Study
Patience Asanga | May 25, 2022
Researchers report molecular evidence of traumatic brain injury in headbutting animals, but other experts aren’t convinced.
A school of juvenile spiny chromis (Acanthochromis polycanthus)
Human-Made Noise Disrupts Fish Parenting
Christie Wilcox | May 23, 2022
The roar of nearby boat engines alters how fish care for and protect their young, resulting in fewer successful nests and smaller offspring, a study finds.
Two adult bottlenose dolphins and one calf swim close to a sandy seafloor that’s dotted with coral.
Study Suggests Dolphins Use Coral Mucus as Medicine
Dan Robitzski | May 19, 2022
Researchers observe that dolphins in a pod in the Red Sea regularly rub against certain corals and sponges, perhaps to sooth their skin by prompting the invertebrates to release mucus that contains antimicrobial compounds.