Scientists Reconstruct Warrior Pharaoh’s Murder Using CT Scans
Scientists Reconstruct Warrior Pharaoh’s Murder Using CT Scans
A forensic investigation of Seqenenre Taa II’s traumatic injuries suggests he died with his hands tied behind his back, perhaps the end result of fighting to liberate his kingdom.
Scientists Reconstruct Warrior Pharaoh’s Murder Using CT Scans
Scientists Reconstruct Warrior Pharaoh’s Murder Using CT Scans

A forensic investigation of Seqenenre Taa II’s traumatic injuries suggests he died with his hands tied behind his back, perhaps the end result of fighting to liberate his kingdom.

A forensic investigation of Seqenenre Taa II’s traumatic injuries suggests he died with his hands tied behind his back, perhaps the end result of fighting to liberate his kingdom.

archaeology
Conch Horn Finds Its Song Again After 17,000 Years
Conch Horn Finds Its Song Again After 17,000 Years
Lisa Winter | Feb 10, 2021
Listen to a musicologist blow through the oldest known shell horn.
Microbes Find Their Niche in Underwater Shipwrecks
Microbes Find Their Niche in Underwater Shipwrecks
Jef Akst | Nov 1, 2020
Early investigations of the microbial communities in and around sunken boats reveal that there are patterns to where bacteria settle.
Climate Change Helped Drive <em>Homo sapiens</em>&rsquo; Cousins Extinct: Study
Climate Change Helped Drive Homo sapiens’ Cousins Extinct: Study
Katarina Zimmer | Oct 15, 2020
Sharp drops in global temperatures helped seal the fate of three extinct hominin species, including our close relatives, the Neanderthals, according to thousands of archaeological specimens and a model of past climate conditions.
Y Chromosome from Early Modern Humans Replaced Neanderthal Y
Y Chromosome from Early Modern Humans Replaced Neanderthal Y
Jef Akst | Sep 24, 2020
A selective advantage may have led the modern human Y chromosome to sweep through the Neanderthal population after it was introduced via interbreeding more than 100,000 years ago.
Amazonian Secrets
Amazonian Secrets
The Scientist Staff | Sep 1, 2020
Watch researchers travel to a cave deep in the Amazon to search for clues about the first humans to populate the Americas.
Genetics Steps In to Help Tell the Story of Human Origins
Genetics Steps In to Help Tell the Story of Human Origins
Katarina Zimmer | Sep 1, 2020
Africa’s sparse fossil record alone cannot reveal our species’ evolutionary history.
The Peopling of South America
The Peopling of South America
Shawna Williams | Sep 1, 2020
While questions still outnumber answers, new findings from archaeology, genetics, and other disciplines are revealing surprising insights into the early cultures of the most recently populated continent.
Infographic: Meet Your Ancient Ancestors and Relatives in Africa
Infographic: Meet Your Ancient Ancestors and Relatives in Africa
Katarina Zimmer | Sep 1, 2020
Modern human genomes and bones left behind from ancient hominins in Africa tell a complex story about the origins of our species.
Ancient Grains Hint at Prehistoric Beer Brewing
Ancient Grains Hint at Prehistoric Beer Brewing
Amanda Heidt | Sep 1, 2020
Microscopic analysis of charred, shapeless lumps from archaeological sites revealed ancient cereal grains that may have undergone malting to make beer.
Infographic: South America&rsquo;s Early Prehistory
Infographic: South America’s Early Prehistory
Shawna Williams | Sep 1, 2020
Genetics and archaeology yield clues as to when humans first arrived on the continent and how these early settlers lived.
Artifacts Point to Humans Living in Mexico 33,000 Years Ago
Artifacts Point to Humans Living in Mexico 33,000 Years Ago
Abby Olena | Jul 22, 2020
If confirmed, the result means people migrated to North America much earlier than thought, but some experts remain unconvinced.
Ancient Beads Point to Far-Flung Relationships in Southern Africa
Ancient Beads Point to Far-Flung Relationships in Southern Africa
Shawna Williams | Jul 13, 2020
An isotopic analysis of eggshell beads dating back more than 30,000 years indicates that they helped build networks that stretched for hundreds of kilometers.
Native Americans Crossed the Pacific Long Before Europeans
Native Americans Crossed the Pacific Long Before Europeans
Abby Olena | Jul 8, 2020
Genetic evidence points to individuals from South America having possibly floated on a raft to Polynesian islands about 500 years before Europeans navigated there.
45,000-Year-Old Human Remains Found in Bulgarian Cave
45,000-Year-Old Human Remains Found in Bulgarian Cave
Jef Akst | May 12, 2020
A tooth and six bone fragments are the oldest confirmed Homo sapiens fossils in Europe.
Image of the Day: Ancient Fiber Technology
Image of the Day: Ancient Fiber Technology
Amy Schleunes | Apr 13, 2020
Researchers discover a fragment of cord between 41,000 and 52,000 years old that points to Neanderthals’ complex cognitive abilities.
Skulls from the Yucat&aacute;n Peninsula a Clue to Early American Settlers
Skulls from the Yucatán Peninsula a Clue to Early American Settlers
Alejandra Manjarrez | Apr 7, 2020
The crania of individuals who lived in the Yucatán Peninsula during the late Pleistocene show a high degree of anatomical diversity among them, and their skull shapes differ from that of other North American populations of the time.
Aquatic Apes?
Aquatic Apes?
The Scientist Staff | Apr 1, 2020
Watch Reading Frames author Peter Rhys-Evans and documentarian Sir David Attenborough discuss the book The Waterside Ape and the impact it may have on our understanding of human evolution.
Book Excerpt from <em>The Waterside Ape</em>
Book Excerpt from The Waterside Ape
Peter Rhys-Evans | Apr 1, 2020
In Chapter 11, “Surfer’s Ear,” author Peter Rhys-Evans describes a key piece of evidence he says supports his hypothesis of a brief period of semi-aquatic living in early hominins.
Did Human Evolution Include a Semi-Aquatic Phase?
Did Human Evolution Include a Semi-Aquatic Phase?
Peter Rhys-Evans | Apr 1, 2020
A recent book outlines fossil evidence supporting the controversial hypothesis.