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Rendering of Escherichia coli in blue and purple.
Bugs as Drugs to Boost Cancer Therapy
Bioengineered bacteria sneak past solid tumor defenses to guide CAR T cells’ attacks.
Bugs as Drugs to Boost Cancer Therapy
Bugs as Drugs to Boost Cancer Therapy

Bioengineered bacteria sneak past solid tumor defenses to guide CAR T cells’ attacks.

Bioengineered bacteria sneak past solid tumor defenses to guide CAR T cells’ attacks.

bacterial therapy

salmonella bacteria 3d illustration
Salmonella Injection Helps the Mouse Immune System Kill Tumors
Dan Robitzski | May 16, 2022 | 3 min read
Nanoparticle-coated bacteria can capture tumor antigens and deliver them to immune cells, triggering a response that improved survival rates in mice.
Illustration showing how following radiation therapy, which triggers the release of cancer-specific antigens, researchers injected Salmonella typhimurium bacteria covered in positively charged nano- particles near tumors in mice.
Infographic: Salmonella Shuttle Tumor Antigens to Immune Cells
Dan Robitzski | May 16, 2022 | 1 min read
Nanoparticle-coated bacteria carry cancer-derived proteins to dendritic cells, enabling the immune system to launch a response in a mouse model.
A stained tissue sample of metastatic pancreatic cancer
Tetanus Immunity Protects Mice Against Pancreatic Cancer
Amanda Heidt | Mar 24, 2022 | 3 min read
Because most people are vaccinated against tetanus as children, delivering benign bacteria carrying a tetanus antigen into pancreatic tumors makes them visible to memory cells in the immune system, researchers report.
Contributors
The Scientist | Apr 1, 2020 | 4 min read
Meet some of the people featured in the April 2020 issue of The Scientist.
Infographic: Building Bacteria to Fight Cancer
Simone Schuerle and Tal Danino | Apr 1, 2020 | 3 min read
Researchers are engineering microbes to deliver therapeutics specifically to tumors, maximizing the treatments’ efficacy while minimizing side effects.
Bacteria as Living Microrobots to Fight Cancer
Simone Schuerle and Tal Danino | Apr 1, 2020 | 10+ min read
Autonomous, living microrobots that seek and destroy cancer are not as futuristic as one might imagine, thanks to a fusion of robotics and synthetic biology.
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