US Pesticide Use Is Down, but Damage to Pollinators Is Rising
US Pesticide Use Is Down, but Damage to Pollinators Is Rising
The use of pesticides has decreased in the US by more than 40 percent since 1992, but the emergence of more-potent chemicals means that they are far more damaging to many species.
US Pesticide Use Is Down, but Damage to Pollinators Is Rising
US Pesticide Use Is Down, but Damage to Pollinators Is Rising

The use of pesticides has decreased in the US by more than 40 percent since 1992, but the emergence of more-potent chemicals means that they are far more damaging to many species.

The use of pesticides has decreased in the US by more than 40 percent since 1992, but the emergence of more-potent chemicals means that they are far more damaging to many species.

birds
Bald Eagle Killer Identified
Bald Eagle Killer Identified
Abby Olena | Mar 25, 2021
After a nearly 30-year hunt, researchers have shown that a neurotoxin generated by cyanobacteria on invasive plants is responsible for eagle and waterbird deaths from vacuolar myelinopathy.
Lessons from Darwin’s “Mischievous” Birds
Lessons from Darwin’s “Mischievous” Birds
Jonathan Meiburg | Mar 1, 2021
An unsung group of South American falcons yields clues to the prehistory of a continent, and hints at secrets of the avian brain.
Zebra Finches Recognize the Calls of Over 40 Fellow Finches
Zebra Finches Recognize the Calls of Over 40 Fellow Finches
Amanda Heidt | Nov 13, 2020
Their ability to distinguish between individuals is strong evidence for fast mapping, a learning tool generally thought to belong only to humans.
Tropical Birds Differ in Their Responses to Drought
Tropical Birds Differ in Their Responses to Drought
Shawna Williams | Nov 1, 2020
Long-lived species decrease their reproduction more than short-lived species in response to lower-than-normal precipitation, and thereby gain a survival advantage, a study finds.
How to Reintroduce a Long-Lost Species
How to Reintroduce a Long-Lost Species
Shawna Williams | Oct 20, 2020
Conservation biologist John Ewen discusses the recent reintroduction of Tasmanian devils to mainland Australia after a 3,000-year absence and issues that need to be considered when bringing long-departed animals back into an area.
The Booming Call of De-extinction
The Booming Call of De-extinction
W. S. Roberts | Oct 19, 2020
Scientists seek to combine genome editing with a technique used in chicken breeding to try to bring back lost birds.
Pandemic Shutdown Altered Bay Area Birdsongs
Pandemic Shutdown Altered Bay Area Birdsongs
Ruth Williams | Sep 24, 2020
As shelter-in-place orders quieted the city of San Francisco, its sparrow population developed softer, sexier songs.
Infographic: Dialing Down the Glitz
Infographic: Dialing Down the Glitz
Rachael Moeller Gorman | Sep 1, 2020
The gene BCO2 enables male and female members of some bird species to display dramatically different color patterns.
The Gene that Makes Female Birds Drab
The Gene that Makes Female Birds Drab
Rachael Moeller Gorman | Sep 1, 2020
In some finch species, the difference between colorful males and muted females comes down to one gene, BCO2, which encodes an enzyme that degrades carotenoids.