collaboration
Alleged Scoop Sours Magnetoreceptor Collaboration
Alleged Scoop Sours Magnetoreceptor Collaboration
Kerry Grens | Sep 21, 2015
University administrators request a retraction upon learning that one researcher scooped another’s results despite having agreed not to.
Publishing Partners
Publishing Partners
Kelly Rae Chi | Aug 10, 2015
Collaborations can boost citations, a study shows.
Russia’s Scientific Squeeze Out
Russia’s Scientific Squeeze Out
Bob Grant | Jul 17, 2015
Lawmakers in the country are moving to blacklist western scientists and foundations that support overseas scholarship.
23andMe, Genentech Partner on Parkinson’s
23andMe, Genentech Partner on Parkinson’s
Tracy Vence | Jan 7, 2015
Firms enter a multi-year deal for the analysis of whole-genome sequence data, with an eye toward drug discovery for Parkinson’s disease.
Simultaneous Release
Simultaneous Release
Kerry Grens | Jun 1, 2014
Coordinating the submission of manuscripts can strike a healthy balance between competition and collaboration.
Sequencing the Tree of Life
Sequencing the Tree of Life
Anna Azvolinsky | Apr 24, 2014
Charting the progress of the various large-scale genome-sequencing projects as researchers working separately on their chosen species begin to pool analytical resources
Doubling Up on Brain Power
Doubling Up on Brain Power
Jef Akst | Mar 19, 2014
Europe and the United States launch a collaboration linking their government-backed initiatives to study the human brain.
Collaboration Bias?
Collaboration Bias?
Tracy Vence | Mar 3, 2014
Study finds that male full professors are more likely than high-ranking female academics to collaborate with more junior colleagues of the same sex.
$230M for Big Disease
$230M for Big Disease
Jef Akst | Feb 5, 2014
The National Institutes of Health is partnering with 10 drug companies to find new treatments for Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and lupus.
Star Scientists Align
Star Scientists Align
Tracy Vence | Dec 3, 2013
While scientific output has suffered in evolutionary biology departments, individual researchers are churning out more than ever, thanks in part to geographically distant collaborations.