Do Commensal Microbes Stoke the Fire of Autoimmunity?
Do Commensal Microbes Stoke the Fire of Autoimmunity?
Molecules produced by resident bacteria and their hosts may signal immune cells to attack the body’s own tissues.
Do Commensal Microbes Stoke the Fire of Autoimmunity?
Do Commensal Microbes Stoke the Fire of Autoimmunity?

Molecules produced by resident bacteria and their hosts may signal immune cells to attack the body’s own tissues.

Molecules produced by resident bacteria and their hosts may signal immune cells to attack the body’s own tissues.

commensal organisms
Infographic: Commensal Mimicry in Autoimmune Disease
Infographic: Commensal Mimicry in Autoimmune Disease
Amanda B. Keener | Jun 1, 2019
Antigens originating from the microbiome may trigger an autoimmune response.
Rat Remains Reveal Landscape Changes Wrought by Human Settlement of Polynesia
Rat Remains Reveal Landscape Changes Wrought by Human Settlement of Polynesia
Shawna Williams | Sep 1, 2018
Isotope changes in the bones demonstrate a similar pattern across far-flung islands.
A Bacterial Messenger Molecule Extends Healthspan
A Bacterial Messenger Molecule Extends Healthspan
Sandhya Sekar | Aug 28, 2017
E. coli that make indoles protect older worms, flies, and mice from frailty. 
TS Picks: October 17, 2016
TS Picks: October 17, 2016
Kerry Grens | Oct 17, 2016
Problematic dietary advice; the man whose cells were fixed with CRISPR; treating toads
Breast Milk Primes Gut for Microbes
Breast Milk Primes Gut for Microbes
Ruth Williams | May 5, 2016
Maternal antibodies engender a receptive gut environment for beneficial bacteria in newborn mice.
Behavior Brief
Behavior Brief
Catherine Offord | Mar 25, 2016
A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research
The Fungi Within
The Fungi Within
Mahmoud Ghannoum | Feb 1, 2016
Diverse fungal species live in and on the human body.
The Mycobiome
The Mycobiome
Mahmoud Ghannoum | Feb 1, 2016
The largely overlooked resident fungal community plays a critical role in human health and disease.
Blood-Gut Barrier
Blood-Gut Barrier
Ruth Williams | Nov 12, 2015
Scientists identify a barrier in mice between the intestine and its blood supply, and suggest how Salmonella sneaks through it.