Adipose tissue under the microscope appearing as red blobs on a white background
Mouse Brains Appear to Eavesdrop on Their Fat
For the first time, a team visualizes sensory nerves projecting into adipose tissue in mice and finds these neuronal cells may counteract the local effects of the sympathetic nervous system.
Mouse Brains Appear to Eavesdrop on Their Fat
Mouse Brains Appear to Eavesdrop on Their Fat

For the first time, a team visualizes sensory nerves projecting into adipose tissue in mice and finds these neuronal cells may counteract the local effects of the sympathetic nervous system.

For the first time, a team visualizes sensory nerves projecting into adipose tissue in mice and finds these neuronal cells may counteract the local effects of the sympathetic nervous system.

communication
a red stage curtain closing
AAAS Shutters Its Center for Public Engagement
Andy Carstens | Aug 26, 2022
The center oversaw programs such as the Mass Media Science & Engineering Fellowship, many of which will continue.
Woman and baby chimpanzee face to face, as if they were talking to each other
Could a Less Complex Larynx Have Enabled Speech in Humans?
Alejandra Manjarrez | Aug 11, 2022
A paper argues that the evolutionary loss of a thin vocal membrane in the larynx may have facilitated oral communication.  
A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words: Making Science More Engaging
A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words: Making Science More Engaging
The Scientist Creative Services Team
In this webinar, Fabrício Pamplona discusses the importance of graphics and visual presentation in communicating scientific messages.
Magical fairytale forest. Coniferous forest covered of green moss. Mystic atmosphere.
The Unusual Functions of Geosmin
Connor Lynch | Aug 1, 2022
The compounds responsible for the earthy smell of recent rain are produced by a wide variety of bacteria and fungi. Recent research sheds light on why microbes bother.
Male common fruit fly (Drosophila Melanogaster) - about 2 mm long - sitting on a blade of grass with green foliage background
The Sex Appeal of Symmetric Songs
Mary Bates | Aug 1, 2022
Female fruit flies assess the physical symmetry of male suitors through the songs they sing, a study claims.
A Scientific Figure of Speech
Science Philosophy in a Flash - A Scientific Figure of Speech
Iris Kulbatski, PhD
Beate Peter shares how her “scientific bilingualism” is the driving force behind her philosophy of science.
Archerfish in the deep transparent water.
Archerfish Defy Notion that Complex Vision Requires a Cortex
Amanda Heidt | Jun 1, 2022
The fish species is separated from mammals by hundreds of millions of years of evolution, yet its seemingly primitive brain can handle many of the same elaborate visual tasks.
Illustration of a doctor in medical coat and mask speaking at camera
Making the Most of Media Interviews
Katarina Zimmer | May 16, 2022
As the pandemic has underscored the importance—and benefits—of communicating science to the general public, it’s also highlighted the challenges that researchers can face in speaking with journalists.
The Scientist Speaks Podcast - Episode 1
The Scientist Creative Services Team
Birds on the Brain: The Neuroscience Behind Songbird Communication and Human Speech
Photo of fish in the Haemulidae family
Fish Are Chattier Than Previously Thought
Connor Lynch | May 2, 2022
Once thought to be silent, fish turn out to produce a range of vocalizations—so polluting the oceans with noise could pose a danger to them.
Image showing diatom fluorescence
Caught on Camera
The Scientist Staff | Feb 14, 2022
Selected images from the-scientist.com
Miscellaneous diatoms, appearing as translucent blue and brownish circles and rhomboid shapes, are imaged in front of a black background.
Q&A: Fluorescence Lets Diatoms Communicate, Coordinate Behavior
Dan Robitzski | Dec 16, 2021
The Scientist spoke with physicist and microbial ecologist Idan Tuval, whose recent paper challenges the assumption that these single-celled organisms only communicate via chemical signals.
Trixie Gardner (left) and Allen Gardner (right) spend time interacting with Washoe (center).
R. Allen Gardner, Who Taught Chimps to Sign, Dies at 91
Lisa Winter | Oct 5, 2021
Gardner famously claimed to have taught chimpanzees to communicate with people using American Sign Language by raising them as if they were human children.
Screams Communicate Human Emotions
Phil Jaekl | Jul 1, 2021
A group of self-styled screamologists are sifting through the noisiness of nonverbal human vocalizations and finding previously undemonstrated forms of communication.
A Song of Spider Silk
Lisa Winter | Apr 15, 2021
Scientists from MIT reveal the hidden music in spiderwebs.
asapbio preprints in the public eye media journalism science covid-19 sars-cov-2 pandemic coronavirus reporting newspaper tv
Opinion: Preprints in the Public Eye
Jigisha Patel | Mar 18, 2021
ASAPbio has developed resources for preprint servers, institutions, scientists, and journalists to promote the responsible reporting of research in the media.
scicomm scicom science communication twitter covid-19 coronavirus pandemic misinformation
Opinion: Being Scientists Doesn’t Make Us Science Communicators
Sarah Anderson | Dec 17, 2020
Effectively relating science to the public is a science in itself, and expertise on a topic doesn’t guarantee expertise in explaining it.
Image of the Day: Stink Flirting
Amy Schleunes | Apr 17, 2020
Male lemurs secrete aldehydes from their wrist glands that may make them more attractive to females during the breeding season.
Generations of Insect Attacks Drive Plants to “Talk” Publicly
Ashley Yeager | Mar 1, 2020
Goldenrods that evolved in the presence of herbivores release volatile chemicals that trigger defenses in neighboring plants of their species, even those that are genetically unrelated.