crop engineering
USDA Will Not Regulate CRISPR-Edited Crops
USDA Will Not Regulate CRISPR-Edited Crops
Diana Kwon | Apr 2, 2018
Restrictions will remain on transgenic plants, which contain artificially inserted genes from other species.
EU Advisor Recommends Regulatory Exemption for Gene Editing
EU Advisor Recommends Regulatory Exemption for Gene Editing
Catherine Offord | Jan 18, 2018
Crops produced using mutagenic technologies such as CRISPR should generally be exempt from regulatory laws governing GMOs, according to the published opinion.
45 Feet High and Rising
45 Feet High and Rising
The Scientist Staff | Apr 24, 2017
Maize enthusiast Jason Karl aims to continue breaking his own records for the tallest corn plants ever grown.
Monsanto Buys Rights to CRISPR
Monsanto Buys Rights to CRISPR
Jef Akst | Sep 27, 2016
The US agribusiness secures a global, nonexclusive licensing agreement from the Broad Institute to use the gene-editing technology for agricultural applications.
Opinion: GMOs Are Not “Frankenfoods”
Opinion: GMOs Are Not “Frankenfoods”
Dov Greenbaum, Mark Gerstein | Aug 30, 2016
It behooves the scientific community to reflect on the public’s “Franken-” characterization of genetically modified foods.
Gene Editing Without Foreign DNA
Gene Editing Without Foreign DNA
Ruth Williams | Feb 1, 2016
Scientists perform plant-genome modifications on crops without using plasmids.
Light-Tolerant Tomatoes
Light-Tolerant Tomatoes
Jyoti Madhusoodanan | Aug 7, 2014
Upping the expression of a single gene improves the plant’s ability to withstand light and increases yields. 
A Lot to Chew On
A Lot to Chew On
Mary Beth Aberlin | Jun 1, 2014
Complex layers of science, policy, and public opinion surround the things we eat and drink.
Better Biofuel Crops
Better Biofuel Crops
Heather Youngs and Chris Somerville | Jul 1, 2012
One way to increase biofuel production is to engineer plants that can withstand harsh environmental conditions, thereby expanding the range in which such crops can be grown. 
Biofuels by the Numbers
Biofuels by the Numbers
Heather Youngs and Chris Somerville | Jul 1, 2012
Of the many available no- or low-carbon methods to harvest energy, including wind, geothermal, hydroelectric, and solar approaches, conversion of plant biomass to liquid fuels is the most cost-effective strategy.