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Cross section of an organic cell with intracellular organelles
How Intracellular Bacteria Hijack Your Cells
Scientists studying pathogens such as Chlamydia, Legionella, and Listeria get a master class in how to control the internal workings of mammalian cells.
How Intracellular Bacteria Hijack Your Cells
How Intracellular Bacteria Hijack Your Cells

Scientists studying pathogens such as Chlamydia, Legionella, and Listeria get a master class in how to control the internal workings of mammalian cells.

Scientists studying pathogens such as Chlamydia, Legionella, and Listeria get a master class in how to control the internal workings of mammalian cells.

endoplasmic reticulum
Illustration showing how some intracellular bacteria, such as <em >Legionella pneumophila</em>, manipulate the cell&#39;s membranes for their own good
Infographic: Intracellular Bacteria’s Tricks for Host Manipulation 
Catherine Offord | Dec 1, 2022 | 2 min read
Various microbes, including several human pathogens, hijack the cell’s skeleton, membranes, and protein-making machinery to make themselves at home.
A false color transmission electron microscope micrograph showing the nuclear envelope, the rough endoplasmic reticulum, the nucleus, and the cytoplasm.
New Gene Mutants Identified in Rare Motor Neuron Diseases
Clare Watson | Oct 17, 2022 | 2 min read
The discovery of gene variants in cases of hereditary spastic dysplasia could provide a diagnosis to affected families where no genetic cause could be found before.
a false color transmission electron microscope image of a neuronal cell body, with lysosomes colored dark green
Scientists Uncover Major Pathway Cells Use to Mend Leaky Lysosomes
Holly Barker | Oct 6, 2022 | 3 min read
Damaged lysosomes are repaired by a lipid-based signaling pathway dubbed PITT that could be targeted to treat neurodegenerative disease, its discoverers say.
New Screening Approach Reveals Novel Regulators of Microcephaly
Catherine Offord | Jan 1, 2021 | 2 min read
Researchers combine organoids, CRISPR-Cas9, and cellular barcoding technologies to identify genes that influence brain size.
Structural Details of Endoplasmic Reticulum Revealed
Jef Akst | Oct 28, 2016 | 1 min read
The ribosome-associated organelle consists of tightly packed tubes, not flat sheets as previously believed, according to new super-resolution microscopy images.
Gia Voeltz: Cellular Cartographer
Karen Zusi | Dec 1, 2015 | 3 min read
Associate Professor, Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder. Age: 43
Targeted ER Breakdown
Ashley P. Taylor | Jun 16, 2015 | 3 min read
Researchers identify receptors that target the endoplasmic reticulum for degradation by autophagy in yeast and mice. 
Palade Particles, 1955
Kerry Grens | Feb 1, 2014 | 2 min read
Electron microscopy led to the first identification of what would later be known as ribosomes.
Palade and His Particles
Kerry Grens | Jan 31, 2014 | 1 min read
Nobel Laureate Christian de Duve discusses the impact of George Palade’s work on ribosomes.
Intracellular Spirals
Kate Yandell | Dec 1, 2013 | 2 min read
Membrane twists connect stacked endoplasmic reticulum sheets.
Organelle Architecture
Mary Beth Aberlin | Dec 1, 2013 | 3 min read
There’s beauty in a cell’s marriage of structure and function.
Bile Compound Prevents Diabetes in Mice
Kerry Grens | Nov 14, 2013 | 2 min read
A chemical prevalent in the bear gallbladder abates a cellular stress response and stalls the progression of type 1 diabetes in rodents.
The Subcellular World Revealed, 1945
Cristina Luiggi | Mar 1, 2012 | 2 min read
The first electron microscope to peer into an intact cell ushers in the new field of cell biology.
Give Me a Hug
Tia Ghose | Feb 1, 2012 | 2 min read
Editor's choice in cell biology
The Enigmatic Membrane
Muriel Mari, Sharon A. Tooze, and Fulvio Reggiori | Feb 1, 2012 | 10+ min read
Despite years of research, the longstanding mystery of where the autophagosome gets its double lipid bilayers is not much clearer.
Traffic Cops
Jessica P. Johnson | Oct 1, 2011 | 2 min read
Editor's Choice in Cell Biology
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