New Evidence Shows COVID-19 Was in US Weeks Before Thought
New Evidence Shows COVID-19 Was in US Weeks Before Thought
Some of the blood specimens collected in the United States for the NIH’s All of Us research program starting on January 2, 2020, have antibodies against SARS-CoV-2.
New Evidence Shows COVID-19 Was in US Weeks Before Thought
New Evidence Shows COVID-19 Was in US Weeks Before Thought

Some of the blood specimens collected in the United States for the NIH’s All of Us research program starting on January 2, 2020, have antibodies against SARS-CoV-2.

Some of the blood specimens collected in the United States for the NIH’s All of Us research program starting on January 2, 2020, have antibodies against SARS-CoV-2.

epidemiology
100-Year-Old Lungs Yield Genetic Samples of 1918 Flu Viruses
100-Year-Old Lungs Yield Genetic Samples of 1918 Flu Viruses
Christie Wilcox | May 18, 2021
Influenza RNA sequences from three sets of lungs preserved in formalin since 1918 provide new insights into the deadly pandemic.
Random Plane Boarding Minimizes COVID-19 Risk: Study
Random Plane Boarding Minimizes COVID-19 Risk: Study
Christie Wilcox | Apr 27, 2021
A modeling study of boarding behavior finds filling the plane from back to front extends the close contact time between passengers and therefore increases the risks posed by air travel.
COVID-19 Vaccines Appear Safe During Pregnancy: Early Data
COVID-19 Vaccines Appear Safe During Pregnancy: Early Data
Christie Wilcox | Apr 22, 2021
Scientists at the US CDC report no red flags in a preliminary analysis of the safety of Pfizer/BioNTech’s and Moderna’s mRNA-based immunizations among expectant mothers.
Q&A: New Tool Ranks Viruses by Their Risk of Jumping to Humans
Q&A: New Tool Ranks Viruses by Their Risk of Jumping to Humans
Jef Akst | Apr 9, 2021
Researchers involved in a long-term project to identify viruses of concern have now assessed the risk factors that could help forecast which pathogens are the most likely to spillover from wildlife to people.
Most Kids with MIS-C Report Few or No COVID-19 Symptoms: Study
Most Kids with MIS-C Report Few or No COVID-19 Symptoms: Study
Kerry Grens | Apr 7, 2021
A review of hundreds of cases finds that only a minority of patients noted being sick with a coronavirus infection prior to developing the severe inflammatory condition.
Q&A: Data Gaps Hinder Monitoring of SARS-COV-2 Variants
Q&A: Data Gaps Hinder Monitoring of SARS-COV-2 Variants
Jef Akst | Mar 24, 2021
Martha Nelson of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases talks about the need to balance data sharing and patient privacy concerns when tracking the spread of variants.
Frontiers Removes Controversial Ivermectin Paper Pre-Publication
Frontiers Removes Controversial Ivermectin Paper Pre-Publication
Catherine Offord | Mar 2, 2021
A review article containing contested claims about the tropical medicine drug as a COVID-19 treatment was listed as “provisionally accepted” on the journal’s website before being removed this week.
COVID-19 More Deadly with Blood than Solid Cancer: Study
COVID-19 More Deadly with Blood than Solid Cancer: Study
Marcus A. Banks | Feb 16, 2021
Death rates among blood cancer patients who contract COVID-19 are higher than for those with other cancers, pointing to impaired immunity that makes it hard to overcome the virus.
Second Person Dies in Latest Ebola Outbreak in DRC
Second Person Dies in Latest Ebola Outbreak in DRC
Catherine Offord | Feb 11, 2021
The woman may have had a link to another person, who was married to an Ebola survivor and who died a few days previously in Democratic Republic of Congo.
Antibody Spike Months After Ebola Infection Surprisingly Common
Antibody Spike Months After Ebola Infection Surprisingly Common
Catherine Offord | Jan 27, 2021
A study of people in Sierra Leone suggests that the virus can lie in hiding from the immune system before re-emerging later and sparking a new response—although researchers didn’t examine whether this could make people infectious again.
Special report
A Guide to Emerging SARS-CoV-2 Variants
A Guide to Emerging SARS-CoV-2 Variants
Katarina Zimmer | Jan 26, 2021
Scientists across the world are closely tracking the spread of mutations in the coronavirus and investigating whether they could render current vaccines less effective.
SARS-CoV-2 Isn’t Going Away, Experts Predict
SARS-CoV-2 Isn’t Going Away, Experts Predict
David Adam | Jan 25, 2021
As politicians try to schedule an end to the pandemic, scientists say the virus will stick around as an endemic disease similar to the common cold.
Record Drop in US Cancer Death Rate
Record Drop in US Cancer Death Rate
Asher Jones | Jan 13, 2021
From 2017 to 2018, cancer deaths dropped by 2.4 percent, the largest single-year improvement recorded in 70 years of American Cancer Society annual cancer reports.
AI-Assisted Cough Tracking Could Help Detect the Next Pandemic
AI-Assisted Cough Tracking Could Help Detect the Next Pandemic
Max Kozlov | Dec 6, 2020
Some researchers have turned their focus to artificial intelligence to study an underused symptom common to most respiratory pathogens—cough.
SARS-CoV-2 Genetic Variant May Be More Transmissible
SARS-CoV-2 Genetic Variant May Be More Transmissible
Abby Olena | Nov 25, 2020
The so-called 614G mutation in the viral spike protein does not appear to cause more severe cases of COVID-19, but multiple studies indicate that it could be more contagious.
Epidemiologist Who Helped Eradicate Smallpox Dies
Epidemiologist Who Helped Eradicate Smallpox Dies
Jef Akst | Oct 28, 2020
J. Michael Lane was the director of the CDC’s successful program to eradicate smallpox.
US Tops List of COVID-19 and All-Cause Death Rates Since May
US Tops List of COVID-19 and All-Cause Death Rates Since May
Max Kozlov | Oct 14, 2020
The authors of a new analysis conclude that tens of thousands of lives could have been saved with a more coordinated national response to the coronavirus.
Bird Flu Viruses Can Remain Infectious for Months in US Wetlands
Bird Flu Viruses Can Remain Infectious for Months in US Wetlands
Catherine Offord | Sep 10, 2020
Lab and field experiments indicate that aquatic environments could act as reservoirs for the pathogens, which typically do not represent a direct risk to humans.
Connecting the DOTS
Connecting the DOTS
Adam Kucharski | Aug 18, 2020
The four factors that drive contagion