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2018 in Quotes
2018 in Quotes
From the effects of political upheaval on research to claims of gene-edited babies, the year has been a tumultuous one for the scientific community.
2018 in Quotes
2018 in Quotes

From the effects of political upheaval on research to claims of gene-edited babies, the year has been a tumultuous one for the scientific community.

From the effects of political upheaval on research to claims of gene-edited babies, the year has been a tumultuous one for the scientific community.

genealogy
MyHeritage Account Data Compromised in “Cybersecurity Incident”
Catherine Offord | Jun 6, 2018 | 2 min read
A security researcher found the email addresses and encrypted passwords of more than 92 million users of the genealogy site on a private server outside the company.
Genealogy Website Helped Crack Golden State Killer Case
Ashley Yeager | Apr 27, 2018 | 2 min read
DNA from a relative of the suspect submitted to the site GEDmatch gave investigators just enough information to identify him, but the process raises privacy concerns.
A Tree Takes Root
Ashley P. Taylor | Apr 1, 2016 | 4 min read
Four apparently unrelated individuals share a common ancestor from whom they inherited a rare mutation that predisposed them to the cancer they share.
Death in the Dust
The Scientist Staff | Mar 31, 2016 | 1 min read
Follow Michele Carbone as he tracks down the genetic and environmental drivers of mesothelioma and other cancers.
Review: Sacred Stories, Genetic Privacy Collide
Ajai Raj | Aug 17, 2015 | 3 min read
Cherished myths and merciless facts clash in a one-act play.
Capsule Reviews
Bob Grant | May 1, 2015 | 3 min read
The Genealogy of a Gene, On the Move, The Chimp and the River, and Domesticated
DNA Ancestry for All
Tracy Vence | Jul 9, 2014 | 4 min read
Big ad campaigns and celebrity involvement have helped increase public interest in genetic genealogy, but helping consumers understand their DNA ancestry testing results remains difficult.
One Big Family
Jef Akst | Oct 29, 2013 | 2 min read
Researchers use data from the anonymized profiles of a family history network to develop family trees including up to 13 million individuals.
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