Two agar plates next to each other. One is empty while the other is growing multiple different cultured organisms, colored white, beige, and green.
Most Archaea and Bacteria Are Nameless. SeqCode Could Change That
The Scientist spoke with microbiologist William Whitman about a new system of nomenclature for prokaryotic organisms that can’t be cultured.
Most Archaea and Bacteria Are Nameless. SeqCode Could Change That
Most Archaea and Bacteria Are Nameless. SeqCode Could Change That

The Scientist spoke with microbiologist William Whitman about a new system of nomenclature for prokaryotic organisms that can’t be cultured.

The Scientist spoke with microbiologist William Whitman about a new system of nomenclature for prokaryotic organisms that can’t be cultured.

genomics
Illustration of pink and blue DNA molecules.
Historic Adaptations May Now Make Us Susceptible to Disease
Dan Robitzski | Sep 16, 2022
Researchers made the find using an algorithm that purportedly distinguishes between mutations that were selected for and those that came along for the ride by coincidence, a feat that has long eluded scientists.
An Edith’s checkerspot butterfly
Genome Spotlight: Edith’s Checkerspot Butterfly (Euphydryas editha)
Christie Wilcox | Aug 25, 2022
A high-quality genome sequence for this versatile insect will likely aid eco-evolutionary research.
Fast Amplification-Based NGS Library Preparation
Fast Amplification-Based NGS Library Preparation
The Scientist Creative Services Team
In this webinar, Jennifer Silverman and Kan Saito will discuss using rapid genome and transcriptome amplification kits on low input samples for next-generation sequencing.
a giant isopod in an aquarium
Genome Spotlight: Giant Isopod (Bathynomus jamesi)
Christie Wilcox | May 26, 2022
The first high-quality genome for a marine isopod may shed light on how this group of crustaceans adapted to the deep, dark depths of the ocean.
zebrafish (Danio rerio)
Caught on Camera
The Scientist Staff | May 16, 2022
See some of the coolest images recently featured by The Scientist
Chromatogram peaks of a DNA sequencing analysis.
Brush Up: What Is Bisulfite Sequencing and How Do Researchers Use It to Study DNA Methylation?
Deanna MacNeil, PhD
Prior to DNA methylation sequencing, researchers treat their samples with sodium bisulfite to distinguish methylated cytosine from unmethylated cytosine.
Illustration of scientists
Opinion: How Large International Collaborations Have Fared in the Pandemic
Sadye Paez, Giulio Formenti, and Erich D. Jarvis | May 2, 2022
COVID-19 has challenged the progress of Big Science. Here are the lessons learned.
Illustration of light blue speckled DNA helix on a dark background
Study Nearly Doubles Known Cancer-Linked Mutational Signatures
Jef Akst | Apr 22, 2022
Analyzing the whole genome sequences of more than 18,000 tumors, researchers catalog nearly 60 new patterns of mutations that could inform cancer treatment.
Uncovering Leprosy’s Genetic Recipe for Success
Uncovering Leprosy’s Genetic Recipe for Success
Nele Haelterman, PhD
Researchers identify what makes certain people more likely to contract leprosy than others.
A scientific illustration of a Christmas Island rat
Genome Spotlight: Christmas Island Rat (Rattus macleari)
Christie Wilcox | Mar 24, 2022
The near-complete genome of a recently extinct rodent elucidates the potential—and difficulties—of resurrecting species.
Deborah Nickerson
Genome Pioneer Deborah Nickerson Dies at 67
Amanda Heidt | Feb 9, 2022
The University of Washington researcher leveraged data from the Human Genome Project to identify genes underlying various health conditions and advance precision medicine.
Exploring how spatial relationships drive heart function
Mapping Out What Makes the Heart Tick
Nathan Ni, PhD
A novel atlas reveals region-specific links between structural, mechanical, and genetic properties within the heart.
A fresh, peeled lychee fruit held above a harvest of fresh lychees
Genome Spotlight: Lychee (Litchi chinensis)
Christie Wilcox | Jan 27, 2022
Whole genome sequences reveal multiple domestications of this agriculturally important tree and may hold the secrets to producing the sweet fruit year round.
Microscopic view of salmonella
Caught on Camera
The Scientist Staff | Jan 20, 2022
Selected Images of the Day from the-scientist.com
The Gripper Tower lab scene epMotion
Automating NGS Library Prep
The Scientist Creative Services Team and Eppendorf
Liquid handlers specialized for next-generation sequencing (NGS) automate nucleic acid extraction and library preparation from microbiome samples.
Organisms from infographic about transposable elements
Infographic: How Transposable Elements Can Shape Evolution
Christie Wilcox | Jan 17, 2022
The movements of so-called jumping genes can generate the genetic diversity needed to drive evolutionary change in populations over time.  
A notecard with outdated names of prokaryotic phyla crossed out and replaced with the newer names.
Newly Renamed Prokaryote Phyla Cause Uproar
Dan Robitzski | Jan 4, 2022
The International Committee on Systematics of Prokaryotes recently pulled the rank of phylum into its code of official nomenclature. Experts say the move will help standardize science in the long run but potentially disrupt research now.
Profiling Microbes in Their Environmental Context
Profiling Microbes in Their Environmental Context
The Scientist Creative Services Team
In this webinar, an expert panel will discuss nucleic acid recovery and sequencing methods from biological samples found in unusual habitats.
Collage of those featured in the article
Remembering Those We Lost in 2021
Lisa Winter | Dec 23, 2021
As the year draws to a close, we look back on researchers we bid farewell to, and the contributions they made to their respective fields.