illustration of inside of gut with floating bacteria
Finding Could Pave the Way to New, Targeted Antibody Treatments
IgA antibodies appear to bind to specific species of commensal gut bacteria in mice, according to a study.
Finding Could Pave the Way to New, Targeted Antibody Treatments
Finding Could Pave the Way to New, Targeted Antibody Treatments

IgA antibodies appear to bind to specific species of commensal gut bacteria in mice, according to a study.

IgA antibodies appear to bind to specific species of commensal gut bacteria in mice, according to a study.

gut
A drawing of pseudostratified gut epithelial cells in the early intestines, cells in red and nucleus in purple.
Move Over Apoptosis: Another Form of Cell Death May Occur in the Gut
Natalia Mesa | May 18, 2022
Though scientists don’t yet know much about it, a newly described process called erebosis might have profound implications for how the gut maintains itself.
Person taking antibiotic pill
What Happens to the Gut Microbiome After Taking Antibiotics?
Sophie Fessl | May 5, 2022
Studies are finding that a single course of antibiotics alters the gut microbiomes of healthy volunteers—and that it can take months or even years to recover the original species composition.
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The Scientist Speaks - Finding that Sweet Spot: Understanding Gut Perception One Cell at a Time
Iris Kulbatski, PhD | Apr 29, 2022
Maya Kaelberer discusses her research investigating how sensory cells in the gut guide feeding behavior.
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Revealing Neuronal Influencers Among the Gut Microbiome
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Mar 2, 2022
In this webinar, Sarkis Mazmanian and Daniel Mucida highlight how intestinal bacteria influence neuronal function and regeneration.
Combining metagenomics and metabolomics to unravel microbiome function
Demystifying the Human Gut Microbiome with Multiomics
Metabolon | Dec 23, 2021
Multiomic approaches identify important metabolites from the gut microbiome.
Colorized scanning electron micrograph of Salmonella bacteria in intestinal tissue
Gut Infections Help Shield Intestinal Neurons from Future Damage
Annie Melchor | Nov 19, 2021
In mice, a kind of immune memory appears to protect the cells against future harm, a finding that could provide insight into treatments for irritable bowel syndrome and other inflammatory digestive conditions.
Optimize Microbiome Sample Collection
An Optimized User Experience for Microbiome Research
DNA Genotek Inc. | Sep 20, 2021
An all-in-one system simplifies stool collection and stabilizes DNA for microbiome profile analysis.
An illustration showing the damage SARS-CoV-2 wreaks on the body
Infographic: The Havoc SARS-CoV-2 Wreaks on the Body
Diana Kwon | Sep 1, 2021
COVID-19 affects far more than just the lungs. Researchers are actively documenting the damage the disease causes to the heart, brain, liver, and much more.
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Fecal Transplant Restores Youth to Old Mice
Roni Dengler, PhD | Aug 30, 2021
Microbiota from young mice reversed some aspects of aging and enhanced brain health in aged mice.
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Gut Bugs May Help Centenarians Reach Their 100th Birthdays
Roni Dengler, PhD | Aug 30, 2021
Centenarians have distinct microbiomes with species that produce unique bile acids, which may help thwart illness.
An illustration of green bacteria floating above neutral-colored intestinal villi
The Inside Guide: The Gut Microbiome’s Role in Host Evolution
Catherine Offord | Jul 1, 2021
Bacteria that live in the digestive tracts of animals may influence the adaptive trajectories of their hosts.
A black line drawing of a mother putting a face mask on a child with a white background
SARS-CoV-2 Antigens Leaking from Gut to Blood Might Trigger MIS-C
Alejandra Manjarrez | Jun 3, 2021
Researchers find traces of SARS-CoV-2 in the stool and blood of kids with the post–COVID-19 inflammatory disorder, and signs of increased intestinal permeability.
gamma delta t cell intestine gut mouse mice diet nutrient epithelial cell remodeling immune system
Mysterious Immune Cells Change the Gut Lining to Accommodate Diet
Annie Melchor | Apr 6, 2021
A study shows gamma-delta T cells in mice respond to shifts in nutrients by changing the cellular composition of the intestinal epithelium.