hominin evolution
Hominins Left Africa for Asia Much Earlier Than Thought
Hominins Left Africa for Asia Much Earlier Than Thought
Shawna Williams | Jul 11, 2018
The dating of stone tools in China puts members of the Homo genus there more than 2 million years ago.
Why Are Modern Humans Relatively Browless?
Why Are Modern Humans Relatively Browless?
Jim Daley | Jul 1, 2018
The function of early hominins’ enlarged brow ridges, and their reduction in size in Homo sapiens, have puzzled paleoanthropologists for decades.
Human-Specific Genes Implicated in Brain Size
Human-Specific Genes Implicated in Brain Size
Abby Olena | May 31, 2018
Three members of a gene family called NOTCH2NL may have been involved in the evolution of humans’ big cortex.
Advantages of Neanderthal DNA in the Human Genome
Advantages of Neanderthal DNA in the Human Genome
Anna Azvolinsky | Nov 10, 2016
The retention of ancient hominin DNA in modern human genomes may have helped our ancestors adapt to life in diverse environments. 
Primates, Gut Microbes Evolved Together
Primates, Gut Microbes Evolved Together
Anna Azvolinsky | Jul 21, 2016
Symbiotic gut bacteria evolved and diverged along with ape and human lineages, researchers find. 
Gap Between “Hobbits” and Modern Humans Narrows
Gap Between “Hobbits” and Modern Humans Narrows
Tanya Lewis | Jun 29, 2016
Remnants of fires indicate modern humans may have lived around the same time as Homo floresiensis.
Oldest-Known “Hobbit”-like Fossils Found
Oldest-Known “Hobbit”-like Fossils Found
Tanya Lewis | Jun 8, 2016
The 700,000-year-old teeth and jawbones of small hominins may be the oldest remnants of Homo floresiensis.
Neanderthals Built Structures Underground
Neanderthals Built Structures Underground
Bob Grant | May 31, 2016
A new analysis of stalagmites stacked deep within a French cave suggests that the ancient hominin was capable of planning and carrying out construction projects.
Less Chewing, More Doing
Less Chewing, More Doing
Catherine Offord | Mar 11, 2016
Food processing in early hominid populations might have played a key role in human evolution by increasing net energy uptake, researchers show.
Contributors
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Jun 1, 2015
Meet some of the people featured in the June 2015 issue of The Scientist.