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Illustration of viruses represented with different colors overlapping each other.
What Happens When You Catch More than One Virus?
The “tripledemic” shines a spotlight on viral interference, in which one infection can block another.
What Happens When You Catch More than One Virus?
What Happens When You Catch More than One Virus?

The “tripledemic” shines a spotlight on viral interference, in which one infection can block another.

The “tripledemic” shines a spotlight on viral interference, in which one infection can block another.

host
Image of a culture of <em >Entamoeba gingivalis</em> growing together with bacteria. There are two roundish amoeba cells surrounded by bacilli and other bacterial forms.
Recently Discovered Virus Family Infects a Human Oral Amoeba
Alejandra Manjarrez, PhD | Dec 1, 2022 | 3 min read
Redondoviruses, which have been associated with cases of periodontitis and other diseases, turn out to live inside the amoeba Entamoeba gingivalis.
four wolves cluster together in the snow next to a tree. one wolf at the front looks out into the distance.
Toxoplasma-Infected Wolves More Likely to Lead Packs, Study Finds
Katherine Irving | Nov 29, 2022 | 3 min read
The parasite appears to make infected wolves less risk-averse, potentially influencing the behavior of packs.
orange and blue cell image
Woman’s Body Appears to Rid Itself of HIV
Chloe Tenn | Nov 18, 2021 | 3 min read
Researchers report what appears to be the second case of a person’s immune system clearing the virus on its own.
Isolated Realistic Coronavirus Covid-19 Molecule in a Biological Environment stock photo
Tweak to N Protein Makes Delta Variant More Infectious
Chloe Tenn | Nov 5, 2021 | 2 min read
Using a novel lab technique, researchers identified a mutation that allows the virus to insert more genetic material into host cells.
Aphid Salivary Gene May Regulate Gall Color
Asher Jones | May 1, 2021 | 2 min read
Whether the galls that aphids make on witch hazel leaves are red or green is associated with a gene expressed in the insects’ salivary glands.
An illustration of an orange bacteriophage virus sitting on top of a green bacterium
Some Viruses Use an Alternative Genetic Alphabet
Abby Olena, PhD | Apr 29, 2021 | 4 min read
In a trio of studies, researchers follow up on a 40-year-old finding that certain bacteriophages replace adenine with so-called diaminopurine, perhaps to avoid host degradation.
Q&A: Natural History Museums’ Role in Pandemic Surveillance
Max Kozlov | Jan 21, 2021 | 5 min read
Host vouchering, the practice of preserving species known to harbor infectious diseases, can be used to help determine a pathogen’s source, scientists say.
green algae, phytoplankton, giant virus, genetics & genomics, endogenization, evolution, diversity, eukaryote
Giant Viruses Can Integrate into the Genomes of Their Hosts
Amanda Heidt | Nov 19, 2020 | 4 min read
Rather than introducing small chunks of DNA as other viruses do, some giant viruses can contribute more than 1 million base pairs to a host’s genome, broadening the ways in which viruses may shape eukaryote evolution.
Cells’ Response to SARS-CoV-2 Different from Flu, RSV
Abby Olena, PhD | Mar 31, 2020 | 4 min read
The host transcriptional signature elicited by the coronavirus appears to be less robust and lacks the induction of key antiviral genes.
Image of the Day: Flood Protection
Catherine Offord | Oct 31, 2018 | 1 min read
Aphids induce their host plants to produce tiny hairs that help keep the surfaces water-repellent.
Image of the Day: First Contact
Catherine Offord | Oct 11, 2018 | 1 min read
Cryo-electron tomography reveals how Salmonella sets up physical interactions with host cells.
Why Bats Make Such Good Viral Hosts
Katarina Zimmer | Jun 1, 2018 | 4 min read
The bat version of the STING protein helps dampen the mammals' immune response to infection, researchers have found.
Cooperative Control
Sandhya Sekar | Feb 10, 2015 | 3 min read
With the help of a virus that infects its prey’s nervous system, a parasitoid wasp coerces a lady beetle to protect its young.
Jumping Hosts
Jef Akst | Jan 30, 2014 | 3 min read
A single amino acid change helps a plant pathogen related to the causative agent of the Irish potato famine infect a new host.
Animal Mind Control
Jef Akst | Jan 1, 2012 | 10+ min read
Examples of parasites that manipulate the behavior of their hosts are not hard to come by, but scientists have only recently begun to understand how they induce such dramatic changes.
Bats Might Be Origin of SARS
Charles Choi(cqchoi@nasw.org) | Sep 29, 2005 | 3 min read
Findings suggest winged mammals could spread SARS-like viruses across Asia, Australia and Europe
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