Giving Sweat the Respect It Deserves
Giving Sweat the Respect It Deserves
Not only is the humble fluid a boon for keeping humans cool, it also contains a wealth of biological information.
Giving Sweat the Respect It Deserves
Giving Sweat the Respect It Deserves

Not only is the humble fluid a boon for keeping humans cool, it also contains a wealth of biological information.

Not only is the humble fluid a boon for keeping humans cool, it also contains a wealth of biological information.

human anatomy
Scientists Question Discovery of New Human Salivary Gland
Scientists Question Discovery of New Human Salivary Gland
Diana Kwon | Jan 12, 2021
A widely publicized paper has drawn scrutiny from physicians and anatomists about the authors’ claims regarding so-called tubarial glands.  
New Discoveries in Human Anatomy
New Discoveries in Human Anatomy
Diana Kwon | Feb 18, 2020
Using advanced microscopy and imaging techniques, scientists have revealed new parts of the human body and overturned previous misconceptions.
Infographic: The Modern Human Body
Infographic: The Modern Human Body
Diana Kwon | Feb 18, 2020
The last few years have yielded new insights into human anatomy. Explore this interactive graphic to learn about some of these discoveries.  
Deathly Displays, circa 1662–1731
Deathly Displays, circa 1662–1731
Sukanya Charuchandra | Dec 1, 2019
Frederik Ruysch’s collections blended specimens for scientific discovery with macabre art.
Smell May Be Possible Without Olfactory Bulbs
Smell May Be Possible Without Olfactory Bulbs
Jef Akst | Nov 6, 2019
A study identifies five women who have a functioning sense of smell despite an apparent lack of olfactory bulbs—the region of the brain that processes odors.
Image of the Day: Murder Mystery
Image of the Day: Murder Mystery
Chia-Yi Hou | Jul 5, 2019
Head wounds in the fossilized skull of a Paleolithic man suggest foul play.
Human Birth Canal Varies More Widely than Previously Thought
Human Birth Canal Varies More Widely than Previously Thought
Anna Azvolinsky | Oct 24, 2018
The pelvic bones of women have been shaped more by random evolution than by natural selection, a new study finds.
<em>Homo sapiens</em> Exposed, 1556
Homo sapiens Exposed, 1556
Sukanya Charuchandra | Sep 1, 2018
Juan Valverde de Amusco’s anatomical drawings corrected some earlier errors while making anatomy more accessible.
Little-Known Gut Membrane Should Be Called a New Organ, Researchers Argue
Little-Known Gut Membrane Should Be Called a New Organ, Researchers Argue
Ben Andrew Henry | Jan 4, 2017
A new anatomical view of the mesentery, which surrounds the lower abdomen, suggests that it should be considered the human body’s 79th organ.
How Your Nose Got Its Shape
How Your Nose Got Its Shape
Karen Zusi | Aug 1, 2016
Climate variation has sculpted our schnozzes since the earliest humans evolved, but environmental pressures can’t explain everything.
<em>Homo naledi</em>’s Hands and Feet
Homo naledi’s Hands and Feet
Bob Grant | Oct 6, 2015
Two new analyses of fossil remains from the recently discovered human relative suggest the species may have been uniquely adapted to both terrestrial and arboreal locomotion.
Is Anatomy Destiny?
Is Anatomy Destiny?
Alice Dreger | Feb 28, 2015
Alice Dreger, historian of science and author of this month's "Reading Frames," explores the blurry lines between male and female in her 2010 TED talk.
Anatomical Art
Anatomical Art
Eli Chen | Jul 31, 2014
Through her Street Anatomy blog, medical illustrator Vanessa Ruiz has connected with a diverse array of arists who draw inspiration from the human body.
Capsule Reviews
Capsule Reviews
Bob Grant | Dec 1, 2013
Tigers Forever, High Moon Over the Amazon, Earth from Space, and Medicine's Michelangelo
“Living Lectures”
“Living Lectures”
Tracy Vence | Oct 31, 2013
Massachusetts-based artist Danny Quirk uses latex body paint to bring anatomical structures to life.
Dissection via Paintbrush
Dissection via Paintbrush
Tracy Vence | Oct 31, 2013
An artist uses latex body paint to bring anatomical structures to life.
Biology by the Slice
Biology by the Slice
Dan Cossins | Jan 2, 2013
German anatomist Christian Wilhelm Braune revolutionized the study of human anatomy in the 19th century with his painstaking drawings of sectioned cadavers.