An illustration showing a scale weighing two double-stranded pieces of DNA that has a big question mark in the center.
Mouse Foraging Behavior Shaped by Opposite-Sex Parent’s Genes
A study in mice finds that for certain genes, one parent’s allele can dominate expression and shape behavior—and which parent’s allele does so varies throughout the body.
ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, BSD555
Mouse Foraging Behavior Shaped by Opposite-Sex Parent’s Genes
Mouse Foraging Behavior Shaped by Opposite-Sex Parent’s Genes

A study in mice finds that for certain genes, one parent’s allele can dominate expression and shape behavior—and which parent’s allele does so varies throughout the body.

A study in mice finds that for certain genes, one parent’s allele can dominate expression and shape behavior—and which parent’s allele does so varies throughout the body.

ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, BSD555

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