Cartoon of a silhouetted person’s bright pink brain being shocked by jumper cables
Electrically Zapping Specific Brain Regions Can Boost Memory
Low-intensity electrical stimulation allows older adults to better recall a list of words for at least a month following the treatment, a study finds, providing further evidence for the debated idea that electrical stimulation can enhance cognitive performance.
Electrically Zapping Specific Brain Regions Can Boost Memory
Electrically Zapping Specific Brain Regions Can Boost Memory

Low-intensity electrical stimulation allows older adults to better recall a list of words for at least a month following the treatment, a study finds, providing further evidence for the debated idea that electrical stimulation can enhance cognitive performance.

Low-intensity electrical stimulation allows older adults to better recall a list of words for at least a month following the treatment, a study finds, providing further evidence for the debated idea that electrical stimulation can enhance cognitive performance.

learning and memory
A white lab mouse peers over the wall of a sprawling maze
Bacterial Metabolite May Regulate Cognition in Mice
Sophie Fessl | Jun 3, 2022
Microbes in the gut influence the death of support cells in the brain by producing isoamylamine, a study suggests.
Photo of wooden block letters
Distracted Brains Better at Parsing Unfamiliar Languages: Study
Catherine Offord | Apr 4, 2022
People who had cognitive functions depleted by noninvasive brain stimulation or a mentally demanding task could subconsciously recognize individual words in a made-up language more easily than controls, researchers find.
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Fecal Transplant Restores Youth to Old Mice
Roni Dengler, PhD
Microbiota from young mice reversed some aspects of aging and enhanced brain health in aged mice.
Illustration of gray bacteriophages approaching and infecting a red and orange bacteria that has multiple fimbria protruding from it.
Bacteria-Infecting Viruses in Gut Microbiome Linked to Cognition
Dan Robitzski | Feb 16, 2022
Research in mice and flies suggests that bacteriophages, including those found in dairy foods, may have an influence on an animals’ ability to learn and remember information.
Old man stands in front of tree, smiling at camera.
Neuroscientist Mortimer Mishkin Dies at 94
Lisa Winter | Oct 12, 2021
His work bridged the gap between psychology and neurobiology.
a male musk duck
Talking Duck Stuns Animal Behavior Researcher
Christie Wilcox | Sep 5, 2021
Leiden University’s Carel ten Cate tracked down 34-year-old duck recordings—and the man who made them—to verify that musk ducks are capable of vocal learning, an ability that hadn’t been thought to exist in waterfowl.
Can Single Cells Learn?
Catherine Offord | May 1, 2021
A controversial idea from the mid-20th century is attracting renewed attention from researchers developing theories for how cognition arises with or without a brain.
Infographic: Investigating Whether Single Cells Learn
Catherine Offord | May 1, 2021
Historical and modern experiments have hinted that unicelluar organisms can learn from their experiences, but the idea still has its critics.
Dietary Spermidine Boosts Cognition in Insects and Rodents
Ruth Williams | Apr 15, 2021
Mice and flies given the polyamine in their diet have increased brain cell metabolism and cognitive function, and epidemiological data hints at a similar benefit in humans.
Early Training Forestalls Motor, Memory Difficulties in Mouse Model of Rett Syndrome
Laura Dattaro | Mar 29, 2021
Manipulating the activity of neurons active during training had similar effects on the mice’s behavior.
sleep, lucid dreaming, dreaming, dreams, REM, communication, Morse code
Researchers Exchange Messages with Dreamers
Asher Jones | Feb 18, 2021
Dreamers answered experimenters’ questions or solved simple math problems, showing that complex two-way communication between the dreaming and waking world is possible.
Scientists Engineer Dreams to Understand the Sleeping Brain
Catherine Offord | Dec 1, 2020
Technologies such as noninvasive brain stimulation and virtual reality gaming offer insights into how dreams arise and what functions they might serve.
animal learning, zebra finch, model organism, communication, fast mapping, individual recognition, cognition, evolution
Zebra Finches Recognize the Calls of Over 40 Fellow Finches
Amanda Heidt | Nov 13, 2020
Their ability to distinguish between individuals is strong evidence for fast mapping, a learning tool generally thought to belong only to humans.
T Cells and Neurons Talk to Each Other
Ashley Yeager | Oct 1, 2020
Conversations between the immune and central nervous systems are proving to be essential for the healthy social behavior, learning, and memory.
Infographic: How Cytokines Flow into and out of the Brain
Ashley Yeager | Oct 1, 2020
Several routes exist for immune cells to communicate with neurons in the central nervous system, though T cells rarely come in direct contact with neural tissue.
Stanford University, psychology, memory, learning, Gordon Bower, human psychology
Human Memory Explorer Gordon Bower Dies
Amanda Heidt | Jul 20, 2020
The Stanford University researcher shared valuable insights into memory and learning during his 49-year career.
Infographic: What Social Isolation Can Mean for the Brain
Catherine Offord | Jul 13, 2020
People who show low social engagement over long periods of time often show reductions in cognitive function. Studies of the brain may provide clues about this correlation.
How Social Isolation Affects the Brain
Catherine Offord | Jul 13, 2020
Absence of human contact is associated with declines in cognitive function. But as the COVID-19 pandemic brings concerns about the potential harms of isolation to the fore, researchers are still hunting for concrete evidence of a causal role as well as possible mechanisms.
Once Is Enough For Long-Term Memory Formation in Bees
Ruth Williams | May 1, 2020
Honeybees can remember reward-associated odors three days after a single learning experience.