Seagrass underwater on a sandy seabed.
Seagrasses Continue to Emit Methane Decades After Death
Methane production, likely achieved by a diverse group of methanogenic archaea, occurs at similar rates in both alive and dead seagrasses, a study reports. The findings highlight the potential environmental impact of seagrasses declining globally.
ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, ELOI_OMELLA
Seagrasses Continue to Emit Methane Decades After Death
Seagrasses Continue to Emit Methane Decades After Death

Methane production, likely achieved by a diverse group of methanogenic archaea, occurs at similar rates in both alive and dead seagrasses, a study reports. The findings highlight the potential environmental impact of seagrasses declining globally.

Methane production, likely achieved by a diverse group of methanogenic archaea, occurs at similar rates in both alive and dead seagrasses, a study reports. The findings highlight the potential environmental impact of seagrasses declining globally.

ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, ELOI_OMELLA

methanogen

microscope image of methaotrophs with black specks
Deep Sea Microbes Produce Graphite-like Carbon
Chloe Tenn | Nov 11, 2021
The first evidence of biologically produced elemental carbon inspires more questions than answers.  
Microbial Fossils Found in 3.4-Billion-Year-Old Subseafloor Rock
Ruth Williams | Jul 14, 2021
The material, now part of an African mountain range, bolsters the idea that hydrothermal veins supported early forms of life.
Blue-Green Algae Produce Methane
Ruth Williams | Jan 15, 2020
Biological production of this greenhouse gas, once thought to be the reserve of anaerobic microbes, occurs in these widespread, photosynthesizing cyanobacteria.
Researchers Discover Salt-Loving Methanogens
Abby Olena | May 26, 2017
Two previously overlooked archaeal strains fill an evolutionary gap for microbes.