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Seagrass underwater on a sandy seabed.
Seagrasses Continue to Emit Methane Decades After Death
Methane production, likely achieved by a diverse group of methanogenic archaea, occurs at similar rates in both alive and dead seagrasses, a study reports. The findings highlight the potential environmental impact of seagrasses declining globally.
Seagrasses Continue to Emit Methane Decades After Death
Seagrasses Continue to Emit Methane Decades After Death

Methane production, likely achieved by a diverse group of methanogenic archaea, occurs at similar rates in both alive and dead seagrasses, a study reports. The findings highlight the potential environmental impact of seagrasses declining globally.

Methane production, likely achieved by a diverse group of methanogenic archaea, occurs at similar rates in both alive and dead seagrasses, a study reports. The findings highlight the potential environmental impact of seagrasses declining globally.

methanogen
microscope image of methaotrophs with black specks
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