A California coyote above Santa Monica beach
Human Gut Bacteria Show Up in Urban Wildlife
The gut microbiomes of city-dwelling animals, including coyotes, lizards, and birds, show similarities to those found in humans who also live in urban environments.
Human Gut Bacteria Show Up in Urban Wildlife
Human Gut Bacteria Show Up in Urban Wildlife

The gut microbiomes of city-dwelling animals, including coyotes, lizards, and birds, show similarities to those found in humans who also live in urban environments.

The gut microbiomes of city-dwelling animals, including coyotes, lizards, and birds, show similarities to those found in humans who also live in urban environments.

microbiota
A premature infant drinking from a bottle
In Search of the Best Milk Recipe for Preemies’ Gut Bacteria
Alejandra Manjarrez | Aug 22, 2022
Milk fortifiers of human origin show no evident advantage in the development of the gut microbiota of premature infants over fortifiers derived from cows, while the intake of the mother’s own milk does, two studies suggest.
Person taking antibiotic pill
What Happens to the Gut Microbiome After Taking Antibiotics?
Sophie Fessl | May 5, 2022
Studies are finding that a single course of antibiotics alters the gut microbiomes of healthy volunteers—and that it can take months or even years to recover the original species composition.
Manipulating the Microbiome to Manage Disease
The Scientist Creative Services Team in collaboration with Tecan
Cammie Lesser will discuss how she turns a probiotic into a drug-delivering machine, while Andrew Y. Koh will describe the connection between the gut microbiota and cancer immunotherapy efficacy.
illustration of neurons in blue with synapses lighting up
Gut Molecule Linked to Decreased Myelination in Mouse Brains
Angie Voyles Askham, Spectrum | Feb 17, 2022
A study shows that a molecule produced by intestinal microbes can enter the brain and that its presence is also associated with altered brain connectivity.
illustration of colorful microbes inside a person's stomach and intestines
How Commensal Gut Bacteria Keep Pathogens in Check
Alejandra Manjarrez | Oct 14, 2021
Recent studies describe how resident microbiota appear to outcompete unwelcome visitors, either with superior weaponry or by guzzling up local resources.  
Infographic: Maternal Microbiota Has Lasting Effects on Offspring
Carolyn A. Thomson and Kathy D. McCoy | Aug 1, 2021
Work in rodents shows that the bacteria living in a mother’s gut can produce immunomodulatory metabolites and influence the production of maternal antibodies—both of which can affect her offspring’s development.
The Role of Mom’s Microbes During Pregnancy
Carolyn A. Thomson and Kathy D. McCoy | Aug 1, 2021
Bacteria in the gut influence the production of antibodies and themselves secrete metabolites. In a pregnant woman, these compounds may influence immune development of her fetus.
Segmented filamentous bacteria artificially colored in green attach to the intestinal wall of a mouse
Gut Microbes Help Coordinate Immune Activity in Mice
Catherine Offord | Jul 29, 2021
The microbiota helps align a mouse’s innate immune system with its feeding patterns, prepping the animal to fend off infection when it’s most likely to be eating.
A close-up of a fruit fly head with antenna clearly visible in front of its red eyes
Bacterial Infections Disrupt Flies’ Sense of Smell
Abby Olena | Jul 21, 2021
The temporary loss of olfaction stops the flies from eating any more of whatever it is that made them sick.
An illustration of several DNA helices on a light red water color background
Human Blood Harbors Cell-Free Microbial DNA
Abby Olena | Jul 9, 2021
After controlling for high levels of bacterial contamination in their lab and reagents, researchers detect microbial genetic material in plasma samples from healthy people and cancer patients.
A bar of milk chocolate with the foil peeled back and a bite taken out
Q&A: Eating Milk Chocolate in the Morning Boosts Fat Metabolism
Amanda Heidt | Jun 30, 2021
A study of 19 postmenopausal women found that eating a bar of chocolate in the morning affected their bodies differently than eating it at night, but neither led to weight gain.
A person wearing a purple glove holds out a blue pill
Fecal Microbiota Transplantation Is Poised for a Makeover
Shawna Williams | Jun 1, 2021
With multiple microbiota therapeutics in the pipeline for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection, clinicians foresee a shift in treatment options for the condition.
Fecal Transfer from Moms to Babies After C-Section: Trial Results
Ruth Williams | Oct 1, 2020
Tiny doses of maternal poo mixed with breast milk and given to Cesarean-born infants makes their gut microbiota resemble those of babies born vaginally.
a baby just born by c-section
C-Sections Tied to “Stunted” Microbiota in Newborns: Study
Shawna Williams | Sep 18, 2019
Research on hundreds of babies finds the delivery method is linked with a greater abundance of taxa more frequently seen in hospitals.
mouse microbiome
Mouse Genetics Shape the Gut Microbiome More than Their Environment
Nicoletta Lanese | Aug 6, 2019
Neither the maternal microbiome nor housing conditions appear to permanently alter which microbes remain in the animals.
Placental Microbiome’s Existence Challenged
Abby Olena | Jul 31, 2019
The authors of a new study find no evidence for bacteria in the placenta, but others in the field question their interpretation of the data.
an illustration of connections between the gut and heart
The Gut Microbiome Can Be a Boon or a Bane for Cardiovascular Health
Shawna Williams | Jul 10, 2019
Researchers seek to untangle the biological mechanisms linking resident microbes to our hearts—and to harness them therapeutically.
Does the Microbiome Help the Body Fight Cancer?
Catherine Offord | Jul 10, 2019
Research in mice and humans is beginning to establish a link between the composition of microbes in the gut and immune responses to tumor cells, but the mechanisms are not yet clear.
microbiome
Do Commensal Microbes Stoke the Fire of Autoimmunity?
Amanda B. Keener | Jun 1, 2019
Molecules produced by resident bacteria and their hosts may signal immune cells to attack the body’s own tissues.