microscopy
Image of the Day: Van Gogh Microscopy
Image of the Day: Van Gogh Microscopy
The Scientist Staff, The Scientist Staff | Jan 10, 2018
Scientists identify the cells that give rise to the soft tissue cancer rhabdomyosarcoma. 
Photos of the Year
Photos of the Year
Katarina Zimmer | Dec 24, 2017
From a plastic-munching coral to see-through frogs, here are The Scientist’s favorite images from 2017.
Image of the Day: Fragile Fly 
Image of the Day: Fragile Fly 
The Scientist Staff, The Scientist Staff | Dec 7, 2017
Researchers examine the effects on the fruit fly intestine of the protein responsible for Fragile X syndrome in humans. 
Image of the Day: Tissue Feast
Image of the Day: Tissue Feast
The Scientist Staff, The Scientist Staff | Dec 5, 2017
Researchers are taking a close look at the bacterium that causes listeriosis disease.
 
Captivated by Chromosomes
Captivated by Chromosomes
Anna Azvolinsky | Dec 1, 2017
Peering through a microscope since age 14, Joseph Gall, now 89, still sees wonder at the other end.
Image of the Day: Gut Sweet Home
Image of the Day: Gut Sweet Home
The Scientist Staff, The Scientist Staff | Nov 22, 2017
Researchers describe more than 200 species of tapeworm from a decade-long collection of tapeworms from the digestive systems of animals around the world. 
Image of the Day: Butterfly Wing Scents
Image of the Day: Butterfly Wing Scents
The Scientist Staff, The Scientist Staff | Nov 13, 2017
In Heliconius butterflies, researchers discover the importance of a male wing structure in female choice. 
Image of the Day: Fruit Fly Factory 
Image of the Day: Fruit Fly Factory 
The Scientist Staff, The Scientist Staff | Nov 10, 2017
A fruit fly ovary can contain up to 20 eggs at a time. 
Image of the Day: Guess Whose Leg  
Image of the Day: Guess Whose Leg  
The Scientist Staff, The Scientist Staff | Nov 8, 2017
Scientists have developed a computer tomography device capable of visualizing objects at nanoscale. 
Image of the Day: Painting with Viruses
Image of the Day: Painting with Viruses
The Scientist Staff, The Scientist Staff | Oct 31, 2017
Researchers have used a modified rabies virus and fluorescent proteins to tag individual nerve cells in the mouse visual cortex.