Famous South African Sardine Run Doesn’t Benefit Sardines: Study
Famous South African Sardine Run Doesn’t Benefit Sardines: Study
An analysis suggests that a commercially important mass migration of fish may have no real adaptive value.
Famous South African Sardine Run Doesn’t Benefit Sardines: Study
Famous South African Sardine Run Doesn’t Benefit Sardines: Study

An analysis suggests that a commercially important mass migration of fish may have no real adaptive value.

An analysis suggests that a commercially important mass migration of fish may have no real adaptive value.

ocean
Fish Poop a Big Player in Ocean Carbon Sequestration
Fish Poop a Big Player in Ocean Carbon Sequestration
Katarina Zimmer | Oct 8, 2021
A modeling study estimates that by drastically reducing fish biomass over the past century, industrial fishing may be affecting ocean chemistry, nutrient fluxes, and carbon cycling as much as climate change.
Cleaner Fish Alter Behavior if Partners Can See Them “Cheating”
Cleaner Fish Alter Behavior if Partners Can See Them “Cheating”
Chloe Tenn | Oct 7, 2021
A study of feeding behavior suggests the fish feed differently in front of their partners—a behavioral feature also found in primates.
Sea Snake “Attacks” Are Cases of Mistaken Identity: Study
Sea Snake “Attacks” Are Cases of Mistaken Identity: Study
Christie Wilcox | Aug 19, 2021
The Scientist spoke to marine biologist Tim Lynch, who dusted off 25-year-old data from his PhD to figure out why olive sea snakes approach divers so often. He says the animals, especially the males, likely confuse people for potential mates.
Tiny Hitchhikers Reveal Turtles’ Movements and Foraging Ecology
Tiny Hitchhikers Reveal Turtles’ Movements and Foraging Ecology
Amanda Heidt | Jul 13, 2021
Microscopic creatures called epibionts that live on sea turtles’ shells can help researchers understand their secretive lives.
First Immortal Cell Line Cultured for Reef-Building Corals
First Immortal Cell Line Cultured for Reef-Building Corals
Amanda Heidt | Jul 1, 2021
Lab-grown cells from the reef-building coral Acropora tenuis provide new opportunities to study bleaching, symbioses, and biomineralization.
Infographic: How Scientists Are Creating Coral Cell Lines
Infographic: How Scientists Are Creating Coral Cell Lines
Amanda Heidt | Jul 1, 2021
Stable, long-term cell lines will enable scientists to study everything from coral bleaching to biomineralization, knowledge that may help protect corals from ongoing climate change.
Comprehensive Atlas of Reef-Building Coral’s Cells Created
Comprehensive Atlas of Reef-Building Coral’s Cells Created
Christie Wilcox | May 13, 2021
Single-cell RNA sequencing helps to catalog the dozens of cell types present in a stony coral, including its elusive immune cells.
While Some Sharks Flee, Tiger Sharks Brave Stormy Seas
While Some Sharks Flee, Tiger Sharks Brave Stormy Seas
Nikk Ogasa | May 12, 2021
For the first time, scientists tracked large shark movements during hurricanes and found that tiger sharks may find the turmoil opportunistic for feeding.
Many Deep-Sea Microbes Invisible to Mammalian Immune System
Many Deep-Sea Microbes Invisible to Mammalian Immune System
Abby Olena | Mar 12, 2021
In a new study, human and mouse cells recognized only one in five bacterial species collected from more than a mile below the Pacific Ocean’s surface.
Atlantic Circulation Weakest in More Than a Millennium: Study
Atlantic Circulation Weakest in More Than a Millennium: Study
Shawna Williams | Feb 26, 2021
Researchers use proxy indicators to confirm long-term changes to the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, which have profound implications for future climate in North America and Europe.
Whale Song Echoes Help Scientists Map the Ocean Floor
Whale Song Echoes Help Scientists Map the Ocean Floor
Asher Jones | Feb 12, 2021
By analyzing how fin whale calls bounce off the seafloor, scientists can recreate ocean crust layers.
Oceanic Shark and Ray Numbers Down 71 Percent over Past 50 Years
Oceanic Shark and Ray Numbers Down 71 Percent over Past 50 Years
Lisa Winter | Jan 28, 2021
Overfishing is the biggest factor driving these species toward extinction, researchers conclude from a new study.
Climate Change Could Drive Sharks to Fishing Grounds: Study
Climate Change Could Drive Sharks to Fishing Grounds: Study
Asher Jones | Jan 28, 2021
Blue sharks don't dive as deeply in low-oxygen waters—which become more prevalent as oceans warm—effectively pushing them into areas of high fishing pressure.
Octopod Sailors, 300 BC–present
Octopod Sailors, 300 BC–present
Jef Akst | Nov 1, 2020
Lore has always surrounded argonauts, pelagic octopuses that build shells and travel the seas.
Nitrogen-Fixing Microbes Found in Antarctic Sea
Nitrogen-Fixing Microbes Found in Antarctic Sea
Shawna Williams | Oct 28, 2020
The discovery puts a nail in the coffin of a long-held assumption about the limits of where the essential process can occur.
Marine Biologist John Pearse Dies
Marine Biologist John Pearse Dies
Shawna Williams | Aug 18, 2020
The retired University of California, Santa Cruz, professor was known for his work on invertebrate reproduction, kelp ecology, and Antarctic marine life.
Image of the Day: Early Bilaterian
Image of the Day: Early Bilaterian
Amy Schleunes | Mar 31, 2020
The newly described Ikaria wariootia was a small, wormlike creature that marked an important evolutionary step between early multicellular organisms and more complex modern animals.
Sperm Whales Confirmed as the Origin of Jetsam Ambergris
Sperm Whales Confirmed as the Origin of Jetsam Ambergris
Amy Schleunes | Feb 5, 2020
Preserved DNA extracted from the rock-like digestive blobs may offer insights into whale ecology.
How Interconnected Is Life in the Ocean?
How Interconnected Is Life in the Ocean?
Catherine Offord | Nov 1, 2019
To help create better conservation and management plans, researchers are measuring how marine organisms move between habitats and populations.