pain
Glial Ties to Persistent Pain
Glial Ties to Persistent Pain
Mark R. Hutchinson | Jan 1, 2018
Immune-like cells in the central nervous system are now recognized as key participants in the creation and maintenance of persistent pain.
Targeting Sodium Channels for Pain Relief
Targeting Sodium Channels for Pain Relief
Catherine Offord | Jan 1, 2018
The race to develop analgesic drugs that inhibit sodium channel NaV1.7 is revealing a complex sensory role for the protein.
Mothers Are Hard-Wired to Respond Similarly to Infant Cries Across Cultures
Mothers Are Hard-Wired to Respond Similarly to Infant Cries Across Cultures
Shawna Williams | Jan 1, 2018
Researchers find consistent behaviors and brain activity in an international study.
Sex Differences in Opioid Analgesia: A Complicated Picture
Sex Differences in Opioid Analgesia: A Complicated Picture
Catherine Offord | Jan 1, 2018
Researchers are beginning to tease apart the mechanisms underlying differences in how males and females respond to powerful painkillers.
Ten-Minute Sabbatical
Ten-Minute Sabbatical
The Scientist Staff | Jan 1, 2018
Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.
Prizes and Penalties
Prizes and Penalties
Bob Grant | Jan 1, 2018
Life is filled with pleasure and pain. Science and society are struggling mightily with both.
Contributors
Contributors
Jef Akst and Katarina Zimmer | Jan 1, 2018
Meet some of the people featured in the January 2018 issue of The Scientist.
Frog Skin Yields Potent Painkillers, but None Clinic Ready
Frog Skin Yields Potent Painkillers, but None Clinic Ready
Shawna Williams | Jan 1, 2018
Decades after their discovery by bioprospectors, amphibian-derived analgesics continue to attract scientific attention.
Sea Anemone Toxin Could Treat Autoimmunity
Sea Anemone Toxin Could Treat Autoimmunity
Jef Akst | Jan 1, 2018
If successful, the treatments could alleviate patients’ pain by reducing inflammation.
Sourcing Painkillers from Scorpions’ Stings
Sourcing Painkillers from Scorpions’ Stings
Abby Olena | Jan 1, 2018
Compounds in the arachnids’ venom interact with ion channels to both cause and block pain.