paleontology
Effects of Neanderthal DNA on Modern Humans
Effects of Neanderthal DNA on Modern Humans
Ruth Williams | Oct 5, 2017
A new study reveals how Neanderthal DNA in the genomes of present-day British people influences their traits.
Human Species May Be Much Older Than Previously Thought
Human Species May Be Much Older Than Previously Thought
Shawna Williams | Sep 29, 2017
From DNA evidence, researchers estimate the split from other species took place between 260,000 and 350,000 years ago.
Image of the Day: Fossil Guts
Image of the Day: Fossil Guts
The Scientist Staff | Sep 25, 2017
Scientists unearthed an intact, fossilized digestive organ of a 500-million-year-old trilobite—a prehistoric relative of the horseshoe crab.
Image of the Day: Ancient Traces
Image of the Day: Ancient Traces
The Scientist Staff | Sep 13, 2017
Scientists uncovered 500-million-year-old fossilized burrows, up to 600 microns in diameter, made by one of the world’s first freely moving animals.
Mongolian Dinosaurs and the Poaching Problem
Mongolian Dinosaurs and the Poaching Problem
David Moscato | Sep 8, 2017
High-profile cases of poached fossils shine a light on the black market for paleontological specimens—and how scientists and governments are trying to stop it.
Scientists Uncover Oldest <em>Homo sapiens</em> Fossils to Date
Scientists Uncover Oldest Homo sapiens Fossils to Date
Diana Kwon | Jun 6, 2017
The new fossils push the origin of the human species back by 100,000 years.
Mammalian Jaws Evolved to Chew Sideways
Mammalian Jaws Evolved to Chew Sideways
Catherine Offord | Jun 1, 2017
Parallel evolution in jaws and teeth helped early mammals diversify their diets.
<em>Homo naledi</em> Likely Roamed Earth with <em>H. sapiens</em>
Homo naledi Likely Roamed Earth with H. sapiens
Bob Grant | May 9, 2017
New research provides evidence that the ancient hominin species might not be so ancient after all.
Vision Helped Ancestral Fish Adapt to Life on Land
Vision Helped Ancestral Fish Adapt to Life on Land
Diana Kwon | Mar 8, 2017
“Buena vista” hypothesis suggests that changes in the sizes of eyes, rather than a shift from fins to limbs, led fish to transition to land more than 300 million years ago.  
Ancient Microfossils May be Earliest Signs of Life
Ancient Microfossils May be Earliest Signs of Life
Diana Kwon | Mar 2, 2017
Researchers find what appear to be 3.77 billion-year-old hints of microbial life hidden in Canadian rocks, but some scientists are not convinced.