Classroom Science Leads to Revision of Megalodon’s Size
Classroom Science Leads to Revision of Megalodon’s Size
A handful of high schoolers prompt scientists to develop a new approach for calculating the size of the ancient behemoth.
Classroom Science Leads to Revision of Megalodon’s Size
Classroom Science Leads to Revision of Megalodon’s Size

A handful of high schoolers prompt scientists to develop a new approach for calculating the size of the ancient behemoth.

A handful of high schoolers prompt scientists to develop a new approach for calculating the size of the ancient behemoth.

paleontology
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“Dragon Man” May Replace Neanderthal as Our Closest Relative
“Dragon Man” May Replace Neanderthal as Our Closest Relative
Amanda Heidt | Jun 25, 2021
A massive, well-preserved skull discovered in China in the 1930s belongs to a new species called Homo longi, researchers report, but experts remain skeptical about the evidence.
Scientists Reconstruct Warrior Pharaoh’s Murder Using CT Scans
Scientists Reconstruct Warrior Pharaoh’s Murder Using CT Scans
Stephenie Livingston | Feb 17, 2021
A forensic investigation of Seqenenre Taa II’s traumatic injuries suggests he died with his hands tied behind his back, perhaps the end result of fighting to liberate his kingdom.
Conch Horn Finds Its Song Again After 17,000 Years
Conch Horn Finds Its Song Again After 17,000 Years
Lisa Winter | Feb 10, 2021
Listen to a musicologist blow through the oldest known shell horn.
Unearthed: World’s Oldest Animal Sperm—And It’s Giant
Unearthed: World’s Oldest Animal Sperm—And It’s Giant
Max Kozlov | Dec 1, 2020
The sperm, belonging to a tiny marine crustacean, dates back nearly 100 million years, making it the most ancient animal sperm found to date.
DNA Evidence Shows Ancient Humans and Dogs Migrated Together
DNA Evidence Shows Ancient Humans and Dogs Migrated Together
Lisa Winter | Oct 31, 2020
The study is the first to show a genomic relationship between dogs and humans on the move.
Climate Change Helped Drive <em>Homo sapiens</em>&rsquo; Cousins Extinct: Study
Climate Change Helped Drive Homo sapiens’ Cousins Extinct: Study
Katarina Zimmer | Oct 15, 2020
Sharp drops in global temperatures helped seal the fate of three extinct hominin species, including our close relatives, the Neanderthals, according to thousands of archaeological specimens and a model of past climate conditions.
Y Chromosome from Early Modern Humans Replaced Neanderthal Y
Y Chromosome from Early Modern Humans Replaced Neanderthal Y
Jef Akst | Sep 24, 2020
A selective advantage may have led the modern human Y chromosome to sweep through the Neanderthal population after it was introduced via interbreeding more than 100,000 years ago.
Initiative Seeks to CT Scan Kenya&rsquo;s Unexplored Fossil Trove
Initiative Seeks to CT Scan Kenya’s Unexplored Fossil Trove
Stephenie Livingston | Jul 30, 2020
A paleontologist at the National Museums of Kenya is spearheading an effort to make 3-D reconstructions of the institution’s fossils available internationally.
Artifacts Point to Humans Living in Mexico 33,000 Years Ago
Artifacts Point to Humans Living in Mexico 33,000 Years Ago
Abby Olena | Jul 22, 2020
If confirmed, the result means people migrated to North America much earlier than thought, but some experts remain unconvinced.
Yet Another Brazilian Museum Suffers Fire, Loss Of Specimens
Yet Another Brazilian Museum Suffers Fire, Loss Of Specimens
Lisa Winter | Jul 3, 2020
The Natural History Museum and Botanical Garden is still assessing the damage from a June 15 fire.
Paleobotanist Brian Axsmith Dies
Paleobotanist Brian Axsmith Dies
Claire Jarvis | Jun 3, 2020
The University of South Alabama professor, who died of complications related to COVID-19, reconstructed the historic range of plants that once grew in the southeastern US.
Contributors
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Jun 1, 2020
Meet some of the people featured in the June 2020 issue of The Scientist.
45,000-Year-Old Human Remains Found in Bulgarian Cave
45,000-Year-Old Human Remains Found in Bulgarian Cave
Jef Akst | May 12, 2020
A tooth and six bone fragments are the oldest confirmed Homo sapiens fossils in Europe.
Robert Carroll, Who Studied Amphibian Evolution, Dies
Robert Carroll, Who Studied Amphibian Evolution, Dies
Emma Yasinski | Apr 23, 2020
The McGill University paleontologist, who died from COVID-19, was known for using multidisciplinary methods to explore the origins of amphibians, birds, and mammals.
Image of the Day: Ancient Fiber Technology
Image of the Day: Ancient Fiber Technology
Amy Schleunes | Apr 13, 2020
Researchers discover a fragment of cord between 41,000 and 52,000 years old that points to Neanderthals’ complex cognitive abilities.
Another Ancient Primate Lineage Sailed to South America
Another Ancient Primate Lineage Sailed to South America
Lisa Winter | Apr 10, 2020
A new fossil discovery indicates a second primate group also traversed the Atlantic millions of years ago on a raft of vegetation.
Image of the Day: Bear Sinuses
Image of the Day: Bear Sinuses
Amy Schleunes | Apr 10, 2020
A new study finds that the extinct European cave bear’s large sinuses represent a tradeoff between hibernation length and the flexibility of their diets.
Image of the Day: Slow-Growing Brains
Image of the Day: Slow-Growing Brains
Amy Schleunes | Apr 8, 2020
Scans of eight fossilized adult and infant Australopithecus afarensis skulls reveal a prolonged period of brain growth during development that may have set the stage for extended childhood learning in later hominins.
Skulls from the Yucat&aacute;n Peninsula a Clue to Early American Settlers
Skulls from the Yucatán Peninsula a Clue to Early American Settlers
Alejandra Manjarrez | Apr 7, 2020
The crania of individuals who lived in the Yucatán Peninsula during the late Pleistocene show a high degree of anatomical diversity among them, and their skull shapes differ from that of other North American populations of the time.