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A side-by-side illustration of bacterial nanotubes, conjugative pili, and type 3 secretion systems such as injectisomes and flagella
Infographic: What Are Bacterial Nanotubes?
Unlike other cellular appendages, bacterial nanotubes are made solely of lipids and can connect the cytoplasm of different microbial species.
Infographic: What Are Bacterial Nanotubes?
Infographic: What Are Bacterial Nanotubes?

Unlike other cellular appendages, bacterial nanotubes are made solely of lipids and can connect the cytoplasm of different microbial species.

Unlike other cellular appendages, bacterial nanotubes are made solely of lipids and can connect the cytoplasm of different microbial species.

pili
A scanning electron micrograph of a coculture of E. coli and Acinetobacter baylyi. Nanotubes can be seen extending from the E. coli.
What’s the Deal with Bacterial Nanotubes?
Sruthi S. Balakrishnan | Jun 1, 2021 | 10+ min read
Several labs have reported the formation of bacterial nanotubes under different, often contrasting conditions. What are these structures and why are they so hard to reproduce?
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
How Bacteria “Walk” Across a Surface
Diana Kwon | Jun 1, 2019 | 3 min read
Scientists identify the coordinated sequence of pili movements that Pseudomonas aeruginosa use to move.
Literature Infographic June
Infographic: Microbial Moves
Diana Kwon | Jun 1, 2019 | 1 min read
Bacteria coordinate a pilus's movement based on touch.
Show Me Your Moves
Marissa Fessenden | May 1, 2015 | 9 min read
Updated classics and new techniques help microbiologists get up close and quantitative.
We're All Connected
Mary Beth Aberlin | May 1, 2013 | 3 min read
A look at some of biology’s communication networks
Bacteria Clean Up
Jef Akst | Sep 7, 2011 | 1 min read
Hair-like extensions on microbes that remove uranium and other metals from contaminated groundwater could one day help clean up after radiation spills.
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