Infographic: Red Blood Cell Shape
Infographic: Red Blood Cell Shape
What happens when myosin inside red blood cells can't do its job?
Infographic: Red Blood Cell Shape
Infographic: Red Blood Cell Shape

What happens when myosin inside red blood cells can't do its job?

What happens when myosin inside red blood cells can't do its job?

red blood cells
How Red Blood Cells Get Their Dimples
How Red Blood Cells Get Their Dimples
Ashley Yeager | Sep 1, 2018
Myosin proteins tug on the cell membrane, giving an erythrocyte its distinct shape.
Image of the Day: Malaria Hologram
Image of the Day: Malaria Hologram
The Scientist Staff | Nov 5, 2017
Optical engineers have developed a portable field microscope that could aid the diagnosis of diseased cells.
Image of the Day: Bygone Blood Cells
Image of the Day: Bygone Blood Cells
The Scientist Staff | Apr 10, 2017
These fossilized red blood cells (right), found in an ancient, blood-engorged Amblyomma tick (left), likely belonged to primates.
Antimalarial Drug Mechanism Explained
Antimalarial Drug Mechanism Explained
Karen Zusi | Dec 29, 2015
Artemisinin targets multiple parasite proteins after being activated by the iron in heme cofactors.
Blood Cell Development Reimagined
Blood Cell Development Reimagined
Bob Grant | Nov 9, 2015
A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.
Soft Tissue Detected in Millennia-Old Dino Bones
Soft Tissue Detected in Millennia-Old Dino Bones
Bob Grant | Jun 10, 2015
Researchers report finding evidence of red blood cells and proteins in 75-million-year-old dinosaur fossils.
Next Generation: Precision Blood Rinsing
Next Generation: Precision Blood Rinsing
Molly Sharlach | Nov 25, 2014
A microfluidic device can safely remove glycerol from thawed red blood cells in minutes, potentially making frozen blood more feasible for routine transfusions.
Microparticles Deliver Oxygen
Bob Grant | Jun 29, 2012
Researchers have developed fast-dissolving particles that may one day prevent organ damage or death by instantly infusing oxygen into the blood.
Self-Harm for Self-Defense
Hayley Dunning | Jun 20, 2012
To protect themselves during malaria infections, mice can kill their own healthy red blood cells, cutting off the parasite’s primary resource.